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Google+ Breakup Is The Future of Social Media
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/9/2015 | 1:31:24 PM
Re: air raid
@mak63- I don't think they are bad for the brain. I think like anything else, you just can't be a slave to it. I know people who just *must* click on the notifications anytime it says "1" or more until they have no notifications. Doesn't matter what they are doing or what they are dsupposed ot be doing. They have to keep it at zero. That's bad. But if you;re willing to ride it out until you have time, I don't think it hurts.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
3/9/2015 | 10:04:30 AM
Re: There's an app for that
In China we don't have FB but we rely heavily on WeChat - I established different group chats for family and friend cycles.:-) I think anyway such kind of meeting place is needed so that you can easily solicit group discussion.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
3/5/2015 | 10:53:29 PM
air raid
After reading the article. I realized how true it is. We are being bombed from many social media apps. Sometimes it's overwhelming how much stuff is behind the notification bar.
I was wondering, if all of these interactions with social media apps (and people behind it, of course) are good for the brain.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
3/5/2015 | 11:52:47 AM
Re: There's an app for that
@Dave that could be part of it, but I think FB will be a central meeting place for awhile - at least until another network comes around that's as widely accepted. When I need to send a mass message, that's my go-to (and it's definitely the reason I don't know most of my friends' email addresses).
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
3/4/2015 | 5:24:25 PM
Re: If I had a dime ........
Ah, well, Google+ is awful - from  conception to interface, it makes little sense, had to track conversations, and difficult to envision on one screen. Google's interface is pretty awful except for the one box for search. The new Gmail App for Android- - case in point. Bells and more bells. Facebook is a but jumbled, but very linear, and does branching very well.

But hey, that's just me. 

As for AOL sticking around, I wonder how popular their chat rooms are -- still a gathering place for fans of <fill in the blank> -- and more private than FaceBook or other services/apps. And, AOL does, or did have private chat rooms. Not that I would know. But if they are still getting people into x-rated chats, then they may be around until 3015. 

When I worked at Prodigy one of the most popular features was the x-rated bulletin boards. Being IBM and Sears, they stopped them. However, when they were available, it was a home run. I worked there, I didn't read them

 
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
3/4/2015 | 5:17:24 PM
Re: I see the same thing happening in enterprise social collaboration
>> People only want to work with tools that they believe are the best for their purposes.

 

Yes, this is often the case. But IT management can change things by taking away the tools that are not sanctioned, and easing in the tools/systems that are. I recall shutting off the ability to save to the C: drive on people's PCs. That hurt, but for security, we did it. Then we took away the ability to use any thumb drive to copy files, and replaced it with a secure-for-sale thumb drive. That hurt, but we did it. Had to do it, and  IT made it work through good communications, good alternatives, and reasonably good rollouts. It was a little more stick than carrot, but we got it done.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/4/2015 | 1:22:52 PM
Re: I don't want 75 Social Media specialty sites
@SomeDude8- I'm old, too. It is just my job to watch these kids (at least so I can get them off my lawn). There's nothing wrong with multiple sites serving multiple needs. So there is probably always room for people who like their one stop shopping. I suspect it is a pendulum. It swings as back and forth as innovation cycles dictate.
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
3/4/2015 | 1:17:47 PM
Re: I don't want 75 Social Media specialty sites
You bring up an age thing, which is definitely a consideration. I am an old fart at 51 years old. Though I am in IT and love new shiny things and gadgets, when it comes to social media, I want simple and convenient, but most of all I want to interact with my friends, keep tabs on them etc.

Younger folks seem to be quite a different case than us older folks. I can totally see them monitoring 12 or 15 different social media applications.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/4/2015 | 1:13:25 PM
Re: I don't want 75 Social Media specialty sites
@somedude8- Pain or no, it seems to be the direction a lot of people are headed. If Facebook didn't own Instagram it would be more of an issue for Facebook, too. People will store their pictures on the best place to store and share them. I think the issue is that people will not tolerate an inferior solution to a problem if they have a better choice. Right now, FB shares enough of those positive solutions it works for your. But as challengers chip away at them, we'll see what happens. Most young people seem to be willing to go where the action is.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/4/2015 | 1:10:42 PM
Re: I see the same thing happening in enterprise social collaboration
@davidfcarr- So here is an interesting issue. There are many tools and someone decided to fill the gap as the aggregater of those tools. I suppose there is always room for one of those. But not several. 
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