Apple Watch: My In-Store Demo - InformationWeek

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Apple Watch: My In-Store Demo
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/27/2015 | 6:11:52 PM
Re: Delayed Differentiation
>I found it to be a comfortable, sleek, and useful device. 

But do you actually want one?

I look at the Apple Watch and I see impressive technology and artisanship but not a device I'd actually want to use.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
4/27/2015 | 2:09:52 AM
Re: Delayed Differentiation
Good point - I'd bet that for many current Apple Watch owners, who had their devices preordered as soon as they went on sale, the Watch is as much a fashion accessory/status symbol as it is a useful device. The battery life is something Apple will have to work on, especially with the potential for apps. We already carry phone chargers on us in case of a dead iPhone battery; I can't imagine many people would be happy about toting a Watch charger as well. 
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
4/27/2015 | 1:43:24 AM
Re: Delayed Differentiation
Agreed, when I mentioned the difference between men's and women's preferences, I was speaking to the size of the watch face. Men typically buy bigger watches because they have larger wrists; I feel that women with smaller wrists might find the bigger face clunky and harder to get used to. Both watches have neutral design and are easy to customize. It'll be interesting to see where the size preference goes over time - the larger face has more room for navigation, but the smaller one feels more like a traditional watch. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
4/26/2015 | 11:40:47 PM
Re: Delayed Differentiation
Very true, but we are talking about the technological update of a very traditional accessory -- the watch.  And, traditionally, men's watches are larger than women's watches.  It is difficult, therefore, for me to expect anything but this natural gravitation, then -- at least, in the beginning.

(And, to be fair, it makes a certain amount of sense; men's wrists are frequently larger than women's wrists, after all.)

Your point is well taken, though.  With the tech update of the watch, new conventions are certainly possible.  Who knows what it will look like ten years from now?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
4/26/2015 | 11:36:18 PM
Comfort/wearability
For my own part, I have rarely been able to judge the comfort of a watch or other wrist-wearable based solely on trying it on for a few minutes.  But it's good that it doesn't feel awkward or painful or uncomfortable immediately; that would be a real problem.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
4/26/2015 | 1:37:04 AM
Re: Delayed Differentiation
nasimson, it also depends on how you see it. I don't see it as a "boys and girls, or men and women," In this century that kind of differenciation should be out. Apple doesn't market products for different genders, or age groups. Apple designs and sells products that are good for everyone. What happens after the purchase is personalization of the product according to one's likes and/interests. And that, has nothing to do with gender, or generalization. The days when boys were dressed in bably blue and girls in pink are long over. -Susan
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