Driverless Cars, AI, Robots: Why CIOs Should Care - InformationWeek

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Driverless Cars, AI, Robots: Why CIOs Should Care
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shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2015 | 8:04:27 PM
New technologies
Well in my opinion it's the time for CIO to think about new technologies and how can they be used in order to cater customer requirements.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
5/21/2015 | 11:39:28 AM
Re: New technologies
How much CIOs want to know about advanced technology, or technology out of their area, depends on whether they want to be early adopters or fast followers, further back in the pack. Keeping up-to-date is a choice. I've always found the best CIOs to be curious about how technology is evolving in all spaces.

One question -- who provides insurance for diverless cars? And how much will it cost?
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
5/21/2015 | 3:20:00 PM
Re: New technologies
@jastroff: I agree with you. Basically it is the duty of the CIO to get information about competing and newer technologies and consult with the CEO, it is the CEO who makes executive decisions on the decision tree of the company. However it also depends upon the success of the company on existing technologies. If the company's technologies are towering over others then they do not need to change the technology throughout. Minor changes will suffice.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2015 | 6:50:03 PM
Re: New technologies
@SachinEE: This is definitely one of those questions that depends entirely on what industry sector a company operates in. Though I do think that CIOs working for companies that were not considered to be "tech" companies, such as insurance, or banking, or retail, may have in years past been able to get away with not being ahead of the curve on new technologies. That has shifted in recent years, and no industry is safe from digital disruption. The general consensus from CIOs I spoke with during the MIT event was that digltal disruptiion is a very real concern across all industry sectors and they're feeling a tremendous pressure to stay ahead of the pack. As one IT leader there told me: "If we don't figure out how to use technology to improve our business, some upstart is going to come along and eat our lunch."

The disruption that Uber and Lyft have cuased the traditional taxi industry, and Airbnb has caused the hotel industry, has made everyone realize that there is no corporate sector that is immune to digital disruption at one point or another.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2015 | 6:43:34 PM
Re: New technologies
@jastroff: your question about insurance is a good one, and it did come up in the discussions at the MIT event. Apparently insurance and government regulations are considered to be two of the impediments facing driverless cars. That is an issue that is still to be worked out. The car has reportedly been driven a total of 1.7 million miles during the past six years, and for nearly a million of those miles the car was in self-driving mode, according to an article in Fortune. Yet, they've had only 11 accidents, all of which were found to be the fault of other drivers: http://fortune.com/2015/05/13/google-humans-to-blame-for-accidents-involving-self-driving-cars/

What i have not seen reported on is how those accidents, none of which were major or caused any serious injuries, were handled by the insurance companies of the drivers involved.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2015 | 1:36:15 AM
Re: New technologies
I read the Fortune's article. It ends with this, that has to be on everyone's mind.

"But first the public must be convinced that the computers, sensors and software that control these new machines will do a superior job of keeping it safe and sound."

Will the driverless car be safer than a car with a driver? My take? They will!
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2015 | 11:21:06 AM
Re: New technologies
That's a good question. Will it be secured without drivers? I have my doubts.
jastroff
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jastroff,
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5/22/2015 | 12:17:16 PM
Re: New technologies
The insurance and liability issues around driverless cars are probably enough to get them delayed on anything but closed highways or used for specific purposes.

Insurance companies hate it, no doubt. Federal regs have to be changed or added, and individual state laws will all have to be sorted. It's disruptive, among other things.

Issues of liability, infraction, ownership, operation (yes, you do have to know about how it works), all have to be parsed in ways other than for traditional passenger vehicles. 

That's why I suspect the first use of the technology won't be on the open roadways.

It's about as complex as the "legalization" of cannabis in Colorado, when it is still an "illegal" federal drug. Many many issues to be sorted - all with economic, industry and personal implications.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
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5/22/2015 | 3:09:39 PM
Re: New technologies
@ Jastroff, Good point. I never even considered how liability and insurance factors would come into play. It is a realistic and logical concern.
jastroff
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jastroff,
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5/22/2015 | 3:48:01 PM
Re: New technologies
thanks. as technologists, we tend to overlook the other side of things, i.e,  how things work now, laws, how people live, liability, etc.

I can't say I'd want kids  in a driverless car. Too much risk? 

But, we go on, and we solve the problems, and lawyers get rich, and technologists get frustrated! :-)
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/24/2015 | 6:29:16 PM
Re: New technologies
@Angelfuego, @Jastroff--All seriousness aside, what I really want to do is get a driverless car, put my dog in the driver's seat & take off down the highway, then shoot video of the reactions of other drivers.

Is that wrong?

:)
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
5/25/2015 | 3:21:13 PM
Re: New technologies
@ Susan, that's hilarious!! That would be priceless.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 2:39:06 AM
Re: New technologies
Apple is researching cars and Tesla is entering the energy infrastructure industry -- disruption is everywhere.

The insurance and financial sector would have been heavily invested into disruptive IT technology by now (not to mean that the sectors are not involved with IT at the moment) but, 2008 and the whole algo trading experience has made the sector to tread carefully. If algo trading at 2008 was considered overkill, it might turn out that the current state of technology of the sector is under-kill.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2015 | 9:49:05 AM
Re: New technologies
Susan: Go for it! I really like that idea.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/22/2015 | 2:21:55 PM
Re: New technologies
@shamika--good point. At the moment the cars drive rather slowly. One speaker at MIT described riding in the driverless car as being about exciting as riding the monorail between terminals in an airport. We have a long way to go.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 2:00:42 AM
Re: New technologies
@Susan, that is a great idea -- airport terminals are one of the areas that could easily be automated since, it involves a lot of repetitive movements. And, users might not worry about the potential disruption to employment that it will cause because, I imagine that the same has already happen when, porters were replaced with conveyor belts to move luggage.

The automation of words through, Wordsmith is an interesting development. I wonder, if Wordsmith has any creativity in it because, every sentence that a human constructs is unique and is relative to the surrounding context. If it is not creative then, it is just a series of logical tests (if this then, that) and users will quickly block the bots.

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2015 | 6:28:31 PM
Re: New technologies
@Shamika--Your view was pretty well the POV of many of the speakers at the MIT event, that it's now the CIO's imperative to stay ahead of any technology learning curves, since every company today is effectively a digitla business.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2015 | 11:24:15 AM
Re: New technologies
@susan I agree. However we had a CIO, who was keen on new technologies, however didn't want to spend on it. Do you think this is sensible?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/22/2015 | 2:23:28 PM
Re: New technologies
@shamika--absolutely not! the key is to balance out the needs of the day-to-day operation of the organization, the planning for realistic needs, and then the forward-thinking futuristic view of where your organization will be in 5,10,15 years. It's the rare person who can be good at all three of these things.
Ben Simon
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Ben Simon,
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5/21/2015 | 3:04:52 PM
Professor Poggio
Probably worth mentioning that Professor Poggio who spoke so highly of Mobileye is actually a member of their Board of Directors.  Maybe Wordsmith's automated article writing tool would have caught that ;)  Interestingly, Mobileye also just put out a release clarifying Poggio's comment citing that Mobileye is NOT currently working with Apple. Strange...

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2015 | 6:26:05 PM
Re: Professor Poggio
@Ben: Touche!

:)

Their statement says: "Mobileye N.V., the global leader in the design and development of camera-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, today announced that an article published in InformationWeek on May 20, 2015 quoted an industry expert and current director as stating that the company is commencing work with Apple on an autonomous driving project.  The company is not currently at work with Apple."

Notice anything missing there?

Curiouser and curiouser...


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