8 Reasons IT Pros Hate The Cloud - InformationWeek

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8 Reasons IT Pros Hate The Cloud
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vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2015 | 1:17:15 AM
Re: The other side of Cloud
@andrew froehlich - but not for security the cloud would be the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. For me and for our organization that's the deal breaker. We deal with big bank info as well as intellectual property. It's just not worth the risk. Our clients would never go for it. They won't even let us have access to gmail and web based email for fear someone would send confidential information inappropriately.
Andrew Froehlich
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Andrew Froehlich,
User Rank: Moderator
5/26/2015 | 10:05:21 PM
Re: The other side of Cloud
@vnewman2 -- I see your point...but to me, the infrastructure is starting to look and feel more like a utility as opposed to something vastly unique from one company to the next. And if that's the case, what's the difference between maintaining you data center in-house, or having someone else do it for you? The one place I conceed here is in the area of data security. That's one place that needs consistent oversight on the customers part.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/26/2015 | 6:58:50 PM
Re: There's a difference between a fact and a possibility
@abrantley: if you ever want to change careers, let me know, there's a future for you in editing copy.

You're right that the sentence would have been more clear without the word "fact" in it.

 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
5/26/2015 | 6:50:31 PM
Re: The Problem is "Public" Cloud for business
>The battle cry of IT needs to incorporate: OWN YOUR DATA! (or someone else will)

Or encrypt it. Sadly, many companies can't afford massive data centers. The cloud is great for when you need 1000 CPUs for three hours, but not for the remainder of the year.
Sacalpha1
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Sacalpha1,
User Rank: Moderator
5/26/2015 | 6:29:45 PM
What You Should Really Be Asking Yourself
Instead of asking yourself what's holding you back, you should be asking what's the business case for moving to the cloud.  Asking yourself what's holding you back assumes cloud is the right answer.  It can be, but it's not always the right answer and making this assumption is a bad practice.  May sure you are using cloud to solve the right problem and make sure it is a cost effective solution.  There are still many situations where internal solutions are the better choice.

Let's also be practical.  Cloud solutions are attractive to small and mid-market businesses in places where infrastructure is mature.  These solutions are significantly less attractive in developing markets and to the Fortune 1000 who have the scale and capability to build internal IaaS and deploy whatever apps they chose, usually at a cheaper cost.  Virtually all of the external cloud deployments at the Fortune 1000 have been fringe deployments to sales, marketing, and HR, where these functions took some non-core capability to the cloud outside of corporate standards.  
Midnight
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Midnight,
User Rank: Strategist
5/26/2015 | 4:12:51 PM
The Problem is "Public" Cloud for business
I come from that legacy collective where computing is just an extension of (dare I say) electronics. Back in the day, the millitary followed a set of IT guideline documents referred to as the "Rainbow Books." Dig out a copy, there is still greater than 90% relavance to issues we face today.

My beef with cloud computing focuses specifically on the outsourced cloud technology. SAAS outside of your brick and mortar generally means you are putting private critical business processes and more importantly Intellectual Property in a third party's hands. Thanks to good ol' Snowden, we now know for a fact that ALL of the major data warehouses are PRE-COMPROMISED. I don't care who has the feed, the fact it exists at all means it Will be exploited in time. So lets see... I am going to put the profitability "crown jewels" of the company I am responsible for keeping safe in someone's vault that is known to be unsecure and will never be secured because of governmental intrusion. A hole that it is just a matter of time before a criminal element will find the exploit and get a massive feed with my crown jewels in it. Hmm.... Does not sound like an even vaguely an intelligent plan.

Early adopter like say, the U.S. government had this very problem but due to data center out-sourcing. I think IW even reported on it. It was when SECRET (and higher) information ended up outsourced to India who outsourced the data warehousing services to China. I mention this to illustrate that the risks are not theoretical, they have already and continue to happen.

I agree the benefits of leveraging the power of todays insanely overpowered computing to build in-house private cloud solutions just makes sense for many medium to large enterprises, however the caveat is In-House.
To many cloud providers and data warehouses are saying they can manage your IT better than you can, but that alone flys in the face of reality. Their people are trained the same as staff you can acquire or contract, and the hardware/software is the same as you can acquire/lease. Thus the only argument left is Cost vs Risk.

A simple ruler to follow is; should a computing function or collection of data become disclosed to my competitors and the world at large, what would be the damage to the profitability of my company. If my client lists, vendor rate cards and market strategies ended up in the hands of competitors (foreign or domestic) how many people in my company would lose their jobs. I believe this is what the boardroom is not hearing clearly.

The battle cry of IT needs to incorporate: OWN YOUR DATA! (or someone else will)
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 3:31:30 PM
Re: I hate it
For me, working with end customers I find 2 issues keep coming up when it comes to their perceived risks or reluctance towards cloud.

1) expanding perimeter: How do we know where our perimeter really ends, and how can we better ensure our entire environment is protected?

2) Security: Not only are we still finding many organizations are barely putting security on their internal/private cloud networks, but when it comes to offsite (public/private/hybrid) cloud, they are putting a lot of security responsibility in the cloud providers hands without ensuring the SLAs are going to protect them.

It causes a large, messy situation in many cases for sure. 

As for vendor lock-in, i don't think it is such an issue now as we are seeing more standardization in cloud providers, so it should be fairly flexible to move around.  That being said, depending on the SLA and how data is perceived from an ownership perspective, there still might be hiccups in how data is transferred and ensured that any copies remaining with the old provider are deleted and proof shown.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 2:50:27 PM
Re: The other side of Cloud
@TerryB - you make a lot of great points.  It is much like when the mom and pop shop decides to hire a bunch of employees instead of doing the work themselves.  Usually the business takes nose dive.  Why?  Because no one cares for it as much as the owner.  And in the case of a cloud-based service - the shepard has thousands of sheep in the flock to look after and your business is just one of them.  Same story as a homeowner versus a renter.  I could go on and on with analogies.

The same care and consideration is just not put into looking after something that's not your own - it's that simple, I think.  
Andrew Froehlich
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Andrew Froehlich,
User Rank: Moderator
5/26/2015 | 2:06:22 PM
Re: Difficult to leave?
@itsofficialleon - I both agree and disagree. Saying that cloud lock-in is "completely unfounded" is a pretty bold statement. As it stands today, there are countless IT admins that can attest to their issues with lock-in. It's a very real issue. After all, if there is no truth to vendor lock-in, than why do you think that migration services will be so popular in the next few years?

Where I completely agree with you is in the fact that cloud providers will begin to adopt migration services. It's not that the service providers want to offer migration services, but they'll have to since customers are beginning to demand it. They'd much rather you stay locked in.
hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 1:45:50 PM
I hate it
It takes away security, hardware problem but it creates new problems.

1) Tools they provide are terrible.

2) Need to learn new things/tools. We are on our own. Each cloud provider has their own tools.

3) Security. How do we know their security is good?

4) When there is a problem. Then the cloud provider blames the ISP. The ISP blames the router.

5) Open too many ports for the cloud. It makes us feel unsecure for our internal network and more load on the bandwidth.

 

 
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