What $100 Million AT&T Fine Says About The FCC - InformationWeek

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What $100 Million AT&T Fine Says About The FCC
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stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 2:11:30 PM
Re: Only $100M ???
re: "The internet(bandwidth/line) is shared unlesss you pay for a delicated line. The idea is you can't be online 24/7."

You know that... I know that... you'd think AT&T knows that too.

I don't know anyone who is on their cell-phone 24x7, but that's besides the point. If I sell you a gallon of gas, you can take a tablespoon, a cup, or a gallon. What's not fair is if I sell you a gallon and then try to cut you off at a cup.

re: "We have a delicated internet line. We pay 300usd/month."

Well, that's a whole other story. At least cellular networks are much more expensive and challenging to expand. Cable/DSL/etc. based Internet is a whole other story. Even if you forget the fact that taxpayers gave the telcos 100s of $Billions to make available bi-directional 40 Mbps to everyone in the USA for around $40/mo... a goal of which they aren't even remotely close (and it was supposed to be in place years ago), and they are charging a LOT more than that... they are still making excessive profits on those services because they've forced a monopolistic situation in the market.

re: "Iphones people w unlimited data are on the internet 24/7. It's not fair if one guy takes all the bandwidth, the rest suffer."

Again, who uses their iPhone 24x7? But, that's AT&T's problem, not something for all their users to work out amongst themselves. They have two options... 1) expand their infrastructure (of course that takes money out of their pockets, so they don't like that option), or 2) put limits in place and advertise those limits accurately.

re: "It's not 2 year contract. My friend is still holding that contract."

It's a never ending contract and AT&T can't change the terms of service or has no way out? I find that hard to believe, as I've never seen such a contract. And, every few days I get some e-mail from some company saying that as of some date, the terms of service have changed.

If there is, indeed, some law in place that prevents telcos from ever changing their terms of service and contracts, then as much as I dislike them, I'd agree with them that THAT is what is not fair.
hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 1:26:20 PM
Re: Only $100M ???
The internet(bandwidth/line) is shared unlesss you pay for a delicated line. The idea is you can't be online 24/7.

We have a delicated internet line. We pay 300usd/month.

Iphones people w unlimited data are on the internet 24/7. It's not fair if one guy takes all the bandwidth, the rest suffer.

It's not 2 year contract. My friend is still holding that contract.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 1:17:04 PM
Re: Only $100M ???
re: "When Apple invented iPhone, ATT offered unlimited data. On the original contract, it has nothing about the slow down."

Makes sense... when you sign up for a service, you expect the same speeds as others are getting, not to be artifically slowed down (penalized) for using the service as offered.

re: "ATT soon find out, people abused it. The wireless spectrum is crowded. They can't do that anymore.

It's *unlimited*... how could they abuse it? What you're really saying is that AT&T offered a plan to suck in customers that they never intended to actually honor. When people took the offer at face-value, AT&T decided it was cutting into their profit margins more than they liked, so they decided to punish those people.

re: "They offer to buy out those grandfather contracts. People refuse the offer. ATT tried to cut them off. Judge sided with those people who have those old contracts."

Once the contract is up, I don't see how AT&T couldn't just change the terms of service. 'Grandfathering' isn't a legal requirement, is it?

Anyway, AT&T is such an evil company (along with the other telcos), that I'm just happy to see them get knocked down... even if it is just a meaningless slap.
hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 12:54:37 PM
Re: Only $100M ???
Everybody does slow down the speed after certain amount of GB data.

ATT problem:

When Apple invented iPhone, ATT offered unlimited data. On the original contract, it has nothing about the slow down.

ATT soon find out, people abused it. The wireless spectrum is crowded. They can't do that anymore.

They offer to buy out those grandfather contracts. People refuse the offer. ATT tried to cut them off. Judge sided with those people who have those old contracts.

So now come the fine.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 12:44:44 PM
Re: That would be one heck of an agency picnic
You do. Every time you vote.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 12:23:42 PM
Re: That would be one heck of an agency picnic
That's a good point... no-one really. That's why I'm concerned about the 'lawful content' aspects of the FCCs powers. Unless the citizens decide to get the government under control, it's all downhill from here whether the end result is corporate-oligarchy or facist.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 12:17:40 PM
Re: Who benifits?
True... but if it damages these companies... I'm all for it!
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 12:16:43 PM
Only $100M ???
$100M is nothing to AT&T, at least not enough to make it unprofitable to pull their baloney. It would be like if you got pulled over for speeding, and the only penality was a $5 ticket. And, as others pointed out... who gets this money? They should fine them several billion and distribute it to people who had those plans.

Note, I'm not saying there is anything wrong with having a set data-cap, or limiting speeds. The problem is false advertising and not delivering what what was promised. If they had just sent out a letter saying that as of X date, unlimited was going away, and here are the new terms... stay or go (along with letting people out of contracts), then that's their business. They wanted to have their cake and eat it too.
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 11:46:17 AM
Re: Who benifits?
That sounds like a job for a court, not for the FCC. I don't think the FCC has the authority to order a company to pay money to people. It does have the power to fine the crap out of evil behavior though. Its about time they started doing it too.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2015 | 9:12:57 AM
Re: That would be one heck of an agency picnic
Sure, but who regulates the regulators....
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