Weaponized Drones Approved For North Dakota Police - InformationWeek

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Weaponized Drones Approved For North Dakota Police
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PedroGonzales
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50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
9/4/2015 | 4:02:25 PM
Re: Alarming
Yes, drones could be used for intelligences gathering, surveillance.  Drones could support police agencies in other areas not just shooting.  I would really like to see how police agencies are using new technologies to help them improve their current process and activities.  Sure, body cameras are good, but i'm sure there are other things that could make police work more efficient.   
mbowler957
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50%
mbowler957,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/31/2015 | 5:14:32 PM
Re: Alarming
@SunitaT0: Legalizing drugs would be better way to destroy drug cartels. Bankrupt them.

How many liquor smugglers were around after the Volstead Act was repealed? None.

Just sayin...
StaceyE
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50%
StaceyE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 3:17:57 PM
Re: Alarming
I ahrew with you david. Id rather have the guy controlling the drone pepper spray or taze me than an officer accidentally shoot me with his service pistol because he meant to grab his tazer...
zerox203
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50%
zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 9:18:54 AM
Re: Weaponized Drones Approved For North Dakota Police
I just mentioned in the comments of your 3D-printed-fish article how 3D printing could be the 'next' regulatory nightmare after drones, but let's not forget... this regulatory nightmare is still ongoing. People's privacy being violated is nothing compared to the issues on the table here. Some recent laws say that drone operators have to remain in visual range of the drone, which cuts out a lot of the gray area... but how do you enforce that? Can police really track down operators who aren't following this? Do they have the manpower to chase every drone down (considering most of them are harmless)? No shortage of tough questions here.
SunitaT0
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50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2015 | 2:46:56 PM
Re: Alarming
@yalanand: yes drones can be hacked, but the worst case scenario would be when somebody is pointing a gun at you in a hostage situation and there is no drone to put him down.
SunitaT0
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50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2015 | 2:45:31 PM
Re: Alarming
@David: like infiltrating a high value target's lair, which would be overly guarded. Drones would be useful in destroying drug cartels.
SunitaT0
50%
50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2015 | 2:43:39 PM
Re: Alarming
While I was in Detroit, I had a really bad experience with an officer of law. There was some unrest, people were protesting something, I was at a diner and suddenly I saw the policeman beside me cocked his gun and went outside to see what the commotion was about. He came in when he saw it was a peaceful protest, did not holster the gun, put it down beside me and kept munching his sandwich. I had never seen a gun before and I was shivering at the thought of how this cocked gun would go off and kill me. I had to ask the lawman to holster it because it was freaking me out.
SunitaT0
50%
50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2015 | 2:39:48 PM
Re: Alarming
I think there should be gun control laws imposed on the public. Some businesses would be damaged, true, but mugging and murders would be lessened.
PedroGonzales
50%
50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2015 | 1:43:08 PM
Re: Alarming
I wouldn't like for drones to be in the hands of people who are stressed out and bored.  I bet police departments will be held liable if their drones harm innocent people's life. I agree with you David, if there is a situation where an officer's life will put his life in danger, then our drone police force will go into action.       
David Wagner
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50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2015 | 3:51:11 PM
Re: Alarming
@impactnow- Right. if used properly, they should only be used in situations where an officer is not the best option. But we've seen technology misused before.
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