Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step - InformationWeek

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Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
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TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2015 | 1:21:10 PM
Interesting
I wonder if lying would still be possible under this technique? Answering "does this dress make me look fat" could become a whole harder.  :-)
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/25/2015 | 2:20:46 PM
Re: Interesting
@Terryb- Ha! Right now, the answer is that lying is still possible because you have to concentrate for the signal to work. You move the cursor with your mind to a yes or a no. And then the signal is sent. But as we get better at this, it might not be anymore. 

I think there are multiple sci-fi shows about just what happens when humans get telepathy at first. It almost always leads to fights because our thoughts aren't as polite. 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2015 | 4:20:52 AM
Re: Interesting

@David you are right. I think a lot of research is pending and needs to be carried out in this field. In one of the discussion earlier I pointed out in a forum that is it possible to traslate a human brain waves and put it in a pictoral form on a big screen so you can see what a man is thinking and you do not need to ask a person what is his opinion when every thing is evident on the screen. I think its a far fetched idea but if proper research is done the day is not far when we will be seeing it as a reality.

SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:11:11 PM
Re: Interesting
@Nomii: Brain controlled tech would have amazing consequences, both good and bad. If there is a thought mapping helmet created, we can see what babies are thinking about this world when they can't speak, we would know from their expressions what line they are thinking along, but to know their actual thoughts? This tech would be a first day buy for me. 
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:17:01 PM
Re: Interesting
The bad thing would be misuse of this tech. I can think of many things in this context. For example, torture? Do you remember Professor X being tortured mentally by Jason Stryker? Mental torture would really take form using this tech, so this would mean newer laws made due to this tech. 
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 12:27:59 PM
Re: Interesting
@ Sunita, Now that would be awesome! If there was a thought mapping helmet created, I would also love to find out exactly what thoughts and images are floating around in my baby's head. I also would love to be able to find out the thoughts running through my dog's head, but I guess we will have to wait a long time for that. It may sound silly, but I am sure some animal lovers and I wonder if it would be possible to engage in brain to brain interface with our pet dog or cat?
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 3:58:03 PM
Re: Interesting
Angelfuego, imagine a device that "dials in" to your cat's or dog's optic nerves and allows your brain to receive those signals, so you're essentially seeing what they're seeing. I would take that approach, versus knowing their thoughts. I can't see their thoughts being much deeper than, that shoe looks tasty, or that corner needs a fresh peeing, or I don't like the looks of that mailman.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2015 | 11:37:42 PM
Re: Interesting

@Sunita T0 absolutely. I think its not only children we are interested in but people of all ages. We want to know what will be the feeling of human beings and to some extant animals as well. We can only see their reactional behaviour but what generates that reaction is a big question. This tech will give us some unanswered question which can further researched to increse our knowledge and helping our generations to come. What do you say?

PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2015 | 12:43:02 PM
Re: Interesting
I think such technology will really help those individuals with physical disabilities, they will be able to contribute to society once more.  I think for parents this device is a miracle. Can you imagine parents who struggle to understand their teenage children.  Now they will be able to understand because they will be able to read their thoughts, it will save a lot of time and drama.  Any parents would like to volunteer?   
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
9/28/2015 | 11:04:58 AM
Re: Interesting
@Pedro, that might be a little overkill for your kids. I'm not really sure I want to know the thoughts of my 12 year old daughter. There are other ways to find out if she really did her homework or not.

I'm not sure that "honest" a connection to anyone is really the best idea. I like it when someone says "Nice Shot!" on the golf course when it really wasn't. :-)

I might make an exception for politicians though.

Totally agree on disability front though. Would be a Godsend for some of those poor people.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:05:02 PM
Re: Interesting
@PedroGonsalez: Nice thought, unless I want to spend sleepless nights. Teenagers think about random stuff all the time and cannot focus on one thing. As a parent I think I would try to understand them first before actually cheating my way through using the thought mapping tech. If I can't control my teenage son/daughter then I am the bad parent. Most people wouldn't have this tech and still their teenage kids would come out okay, and if you have one and your teenage kids don't turn out okay, who will be to blame? 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2015 | 11:32:45 PM
Re: Interesting

@Sunita I agree with you there. I think that the child behaviour takes sudden transformation s his age changes. His mental approach towards things also differ with passage of time. He at occasions be pesimistic and on other optimistic. He can be introvert on some thing while act as extrovert on other. I think understanding a child is thye biggest challenge. But it can be done if he shows a bit of maturity in his decisions so you can understand his thoughts better. I believe you concern is genuine and it will be a great help if we can see in to their mind when there is still some time so we can ammend their behaviours.

nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2015 | 4:16:02 AM
Re: Interesting

@Terry you are right. While going through these sites archives I came across a discussion on this very subject and people where discussing about the implication of translating brain waves and calculating the data which is saved in the concious and sub concious of a human brain. At that time it was seem a hypotheitical discussion but now it is more closer to a reality then ever before. Agreat leap indeed.

Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 12:29:45 PM
Re: Interesting
This brain to brain interface practice might be able to help understand how people with disabilities think and perhaps assist them. I am curious to see how far researchers go with this.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2015 | 12:08:11 PM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
This is way cool. If something seems too good to be true, it often is, and it does look like  the University of Washington study automates (or, doesn't automate) a few more steps than less honest article writers than yourself might have us believe, Dave. In addition to the 'yes/no' output being the moving of a cursor, the receiver simply sees a flash of light for 'yes' and nothing for no - then they tell their computer what they saw through manual input. they're also picking from a pretty short pre-determined list of items and questions. Nevertheless, 72% is a decisive outcome, and as you said, this is an inventive use of these core bulding blocks and an amazing step towards the future. The interplay of these technologies could be the next mobile revolution, sprouting up and going global faster than we know it.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/29/2015 | 1:07:52 PM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
@zerox203- I think the light for yes and no light for no makes sense. We use technology to help us interpret stuff all the time. Cars don't have go lights and brake lights. They only have brake lights. That said, you are right that if they don't feel like they can successfully differentiate "yes" and "no" they have a long way to go to get to full sentences. Still, this is a proof of concept, not a full-blown product.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 7:25:02 PM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
This is completely mind-blowing to me (pun-intended) but when you get right down to it, with the advent of modern technology, it was a natural evolution.  Brain waves are merely are merely data that gets interpreted at some sort of "terminal" in the body.  So it makes sense that there would be a way to harness that information and interpret it using a different means.  But still...wow!
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 12:23:33 PM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
At first the thought of "brain to brain interface," seemed a little mind boggling to me and a little scary. However, when I continued to read the article, I think this is an amazing first step that could transform lives and manifest miracles.  I am especially intrigued about how this can help people that are paralyzed.  I look forward to learning more as more steps and research takes place regarding this topic.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2015 | 11:46:19 PM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step

@vnewman2 I agree with your thought. In same context where we can just see into the hidden chambers of the b rain and get the information there. It can be a great help to solve some unsolved criminal mysteries. We can extract the information from a person without his consent and we can caught the culprit and innocent will not be given undue punishment. My be I am talking a way ahead right now but still feel the good aspects of this tech if can be developed to its true potential. What is your opinion?

Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
10/10/2015 | 10:18:47 AM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
@Broadway    Yes, that would be amazing. Howver, my bet would be that their thinking is a lot deeper than humans give them credit for. I have a feeling that cats, along with other animals, are more emotional and intelligent than we realize. Perhaps, such technology used between animals and humans could confirm or deny my suspicions.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 10:38:32 AM
Re: Brain-To-Brain Interface: A Bold First Step
@Dave,

Well put. The fact that even one step in the process truly involves a computer correctly interpreting human brain signals (which it does) makes it amazing. The '20 questions' angle just makes it seem a little juicier than it might be otherwise. It could easily be 'think of a number 1-5' - 'is it five?' 'no" is it four?'', etc. and be using identical technology. The computer has no awareness that we're thinking about Tiramisu. My main point bringing this up is concern that those lacking understanding will jump to false conclusions - like those who think 'killer robots' when we say 'machine learning'. This could lead to some great things, though.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
9/28/2015 | 3:01:12 PM
Hacking
The tech behind "mind-controlled devices" is pretty amazing, and hopefully will be broadly available soon.
I wonder if the big AV companies should start working on a countermeasure already in case we ingest a trojan or a rat program, and our thoughts are about to be hacked.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:01:14 PM
Re: Hacking
If zombies aren't real, they soon will be! Zombification through brain hacking! Tech is really interesting, as long as it doesn't give birth to mass murderers and remotely controlled hitmen. An antenna in the brain? C'mon! This tech needs to be safe. 


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