Why Fixes To Tech's Diversity Problem Fail - InformationWeek

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Why Fixes To Tech's Diversity Problem Fail
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impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
10/28/2015 | 12:10:19 PM
Re: Misuse of Statistics Dilutes the Argument

yaaland while we would hope that was the case for every job sadly it is not. Bias can be overt or subconscious as all the research has shown for years. The bias presents itself not only in the hiring process but in the retention and promotion processes in organizations. Until we see more people that are truly agnostic toward differences this will not change and those in positions of power will hire those that most closely reflect themselves.

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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 4:41:53 PM
Re: Possible problem
@driedsquid- Well, it is a problem from the point of view that clearly more people wanted in than stayed. So clearly IT is doing something to drive them away. That can't be good, right? 

But also study after study has shown IT departments that are diverse perform better. So if you want to be a successful company you need to have lots of points of view. 

That said, no one is asking for every job at every company to be perfectly aligned and representational to population numbers. The goal is to create a space where the numbers take care of themselves in the end. But it is clear that isn't happening right now, because people are getting into and then leaving the industry. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 1:12:28 PM
Re: All companies in one spot
@moarsauce123- Well, it is the same reason why steel mills were all centered in the what is now the rust belt. Concentrations of resources mean that businesses concentrate. In this case, the talent levels of engineers from Stanford and Berkeley and elsewhere created industries that drew more talent. And they drew more talent etc.

The same can be said of tech centers around MIT and Harvard, or in Austin, research triangle, etc.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 1:09:34 PM
Re: Fixing the Diversity & Inclusion Challenge in Tech
@Gary_El- Well, I don't know about the urban experience thing. But I know that what you are saying means that if you are squeezing groups out because housing is getting expensive you are not giving opportunities to the groups you are squeezing out to make the money the groups that are doing the squeezing can make.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 12:58:43 PM
Re: Misuse of Statistics Dilutes the Argument
@DJ Liu- Thank you for your comment. I certainly don't want to do what you think I've done. But I feel like between what I could include int he article and what I linked to I made the case that not only are there more degrees being granted but total employment among minorities is not growing. the argument I'm making isn't about hiring (though minority hiring isn't in line with degrees offered either). It is about people staying in the field. 

So, just for argument's sake, let's say those 18% of degrees that went to hispanic and African American CS majors all were leading to jobs. We'd expect to see, eventually, that the number of hispanics and African Americans in IT would be growing. The same with women. However, that isn't true. It is basically flat. 

The reason is not new hires specifically. It is that once new hires arrive they don't like what they see. So, while I'm certainly interested in new hire numbers, they aren't actually relevant to the argument I'm making here which is that for at least the last decade, we've been inspiring more minorities to get into IT than we've inspired to stay.
Ariella
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50%
Ariella,
User Rank: Author
10/23/2015 | 10:18:19 AM
Re:fixes
<But, of course, changing the culture within tech companies is much harder than dropping millions of dollars on outreach programs to "inspire" minorities and women. I hope I'm wrong, but these types of programs do nothing to inspire the real change that needs to take place.>

I'm inclined to agree wtih you on that.


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