Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds - InformationWeek

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Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
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nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
11/4/2015 | 10:34:18 AM
My lost time

@David a very fine article and an informative one. I have never thought it like that and feels that smart phone is a necessity but after going through this article and weighing my daily routine I waseally surprised that it might be more than what you have highlighted. I believe that if I can get these hours back in my life Iwill undoubtedly spend it with my kids and family. Thanks for the info and making us realize.

zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
11/4/2015 | 11:11:56 AM
Re: Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
Surprising, yet perhaps not at the same time. The study notes a lot of that phone interaction was in 30-second bursts, and if you pay close attention to people, that's not too hard to confirm. 'Checking our phone' has become the default action to fill time, past the point of ridiculousness. Get on the elevator? Check your phone. Get off the elevator? Check your phone. More than people ever checked watches. It's a big deal. Rude people even do it while you're talking to them. A lot of that time can be social, or functional (text your roommate to see if they picked up dinner, saving you a trip), but five hours is a lot. That said, I'm equally scared by 2.5 hours average watching TV. I definitely watch less than that... or do I?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
11/4/2015 | 11:50:56 AM
Re: Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
@zerox203- The TV stat is interesting to me, because for me TV has become the second screen. I am quite sure that my TV is on way more than 2.5 hours in a day. I'm sure I have Sportscenter on a loop during my morning activities. On the weekends, I have some live sporting event on basically from 9 AM until 9 PM but I'm not "watching it" as in sitting down and doing nothing but watching it. And even when I sit down to watch a favorite show, I tend to have my laptop or phone out with me.

I don't know if that makes it better or worse. But it makes all of this data trickier to navigate.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
11/4/2015 | 11:56:55 AM
Re: My lost time
@nomii- Glad it was helpful. One oof the great problems of the 21st century in my opinion (and I'm planning on writing a story about this shortly) is making our technology work for us rather than having us work for our technology. Jeff Immelt said at Gartner that office worker productivity has been basically stagnant for the last decade or so (I have yet to check that number). His reasoning is that technology is no longer helping but getting in the way.

If smartphones, big data, cloud, web2.0, etc are such miracles, why aren't we getting more productive? I think the reasons have to do with the way we deply and use technology. I'm going to be looking into it in the next week or two, but I think they is one of those clues to the puzzle.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
11/4/2015 | 12:17:52 PM
Re: My lost time

@David I believe that these apps are planned that way. The change or so called improvement in tech is dfficult to comprehend by an average user and due to that it will always remain slave to the tech. There are very few success stories where people have change their surroundings according to their requirement. Most of us will live our life times being dependent or semi dependent on these things. I will be supportive if you write how can we turn the tables in our favour. Thanks

Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
11/4/2015 | 12:25:33 PM
Re: Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
I'm at the end of a two-day stretch of not having a phone. The digital detox was 1. welcome and 2. a great lesson in how often I (and those around me) are connected. Everywhere I go, people are staring at a screen - waiting for the elevator, on the elevator, waiting for the train, walking down the sidewalk. Of course, I'm totally guilty of this too, but now I'm making a conscious effort to check my phone less frequently.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/5/2015 | 9:11:33 AM
Re: Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
I think it's less killing time and more of an addictive trait.  People are addicted to notification counters, there have been studies that people become more anxious when their smart phones are taken away.  The fear there is that they might miss something.  We have become an immediate communication society so people feel the need to be connected at all times.  The more communication you do this way the harder the habit of constantly checking for new information is. 
dried_squid
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dried_squid,
User Rank: Moderator
11/5/2015 | 3:20:16 PM
More is better
    Philip Kotler in "Conftronting Captialism" considers "marketing as the engine of the economy". I saw him present on booktv.org. I purchased the book.

    We could blame the marketing people for pulling our strings, or ... look in the mirror.

    Has anyone figured out if "smartphone use" is reactive, or proactive? For me, smart phone use is not practical, I rather spend the money, the additional cost of unlimited connect, on food purchased locally, or paper books purchased locally, or music purchased locally. More me and jobs in my city, and life first hand. Maybe it costs a little more.

    I'm employed, and five hours a day seems like a lot of money - 5 x my hourly wage.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
11/6/2015 | 8:08:05 AM
Re: Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
@SaneIT,

Addictive? Absolutely. I was trying to get at that without being too divisive. Dave himself posted an article some time ago covering how the modern attention span has been shortened to... I think seven seconds (in large part due to device use). That's terrifying. People have to check their phones. There are some tangible benefits to it, though. That same study showed we're quicker problem-solvers as a result. We can absorb the most important information in front of us at a glance. It's a big change in society that took us overnight. Benefits and drawbacks.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/9/2015 | 8:15:30 AM
Re: Smartphone Use Ballooning To 5 Hours A Day, Study Finds
I'm going to argue that maybe we don't need to be quicker problem solvers and that we need to be effective problem solvers.  I find that people do make quicker decisions but does that solve a problem?  I see more of these fast decisions being mad to get to a solution rather than a more well thought out solution the first time.  To me it's solving problems by a 1000 cuts rather than fully understanding the problem and working through it.  I'm not saying every problem is solved this way now but I see so many email and text threads that go 50 messages deep when they could have been resolved with one. 
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