Stanford Study Will Inspire Any IT Pro Intrigued By Machine Learning - InformationWeek

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Stanford Study Will Inspire Any IT Pro Intrigued By Machine Learning
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jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2016 | 12:27:24 PM
Re: Data overload?
Got it. The sad thing is that people in jobs and organizations that stress obedience and permit little or no discretion are the ones most likely to be replaced with machines; though that may be management's own punishment, since humans have been known to quietly improvise when official procedures are obviously insane given the circumstances, or when there are no rules applicable to the case. "The Peter Principle" discusses "computerized incompetence" at length, and I think the concept applies here.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2016 | 8:29:57 AM
Re: Data overload?
I think we're on the same page here.  My point was that when it comes to task based jobs humans tend to act like machines that are programmed to do the tasks in a specific manner.  I do a lot of working with processes in various departments that reflect this kind of programming.  "Why are you doing it this way?" is usually met with "That's the way we've always done it."  They are programmed not that it's the right way or the best way but it's THE way.  Many people don't feel like they can change processes like this so I get one of two reactions when they see me coming, either fear that I'm about to change things and they will be uncomfortable with the change or excited because they know there has to be a better way and they'll get to voice that and help move away from something they have felt is broken.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 11:37:04 AM
Re: Data overload?
I didn't say humans couldn't be programmed, but unlike computers, we have wills of our own (though sometimes suppressed by abuse) and thoughts of our own (sometimes to the annoyance of those in authority over us) and are thus in a position to resist our programming, or even to reprogram ourselves (at least in part).  Computers can only follow orders.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 8:21:35 AM
Re: Data overload?
Since grammar counts, I think the right way for me to have typed that would have been "humans are programmed, just like software."  Humans are indeed programmed.  We can choose what we want to learn and we can adjust how we react and how we use the information we have but watch an assembly line worker some time.  They are programmed to put part B onto part A and repeat for an 8 hour shift.  Someone else holds the knowledge of what parts A and B do and why they are assembled in this manner. When a job such as viewing hundreds of images a day to identify anomalies is performed by humans they fall into a routine the same way software routines work.  It becomes automatic and if they are having an off day and can't process what they are seeing as quickly as they did the day before then errors pile up.  I'm not referring to creative tasks or hobbies but looking at the task based jobs that many humans have settled into.

 
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2016 | 9:38:05 AM
Re: Data overload?
No, humans are not programmed in the same manner as computers.  That's really the point.  In the end, computers are nothing more than general purpose programmable calculators, completely unable to comprehend the world around them and able to do only what they are told (assuming they are correctly instructed, which is frequently not the case).  They have zero imagination, zero creativity, and only the judgment programmed into them by humans.  They have zero ability to think for themselves.  They are tools, nothing more and nothing less.  We may someday have something like HAL or Data (which would open up a whole new can or worms); but right now, we're not even close.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2016 | 8:30:41 AM
Re: Data overload?
That is a very common issue, humans are programmed just like software.  They go through years of training to spot specific things.  We go through life watching things happen and predicting outcomes based on personal history.  We tend to get a little data blind when we think we know what we're looking at or looking for.  An AI that is designed to look at thousands of factors vs a human that can handle about a dozen at a time will increase accuracy over time.  I look forward to faster more accurate testing in cases like this.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2016 | 7:33:51 AM
Re: Data overload?
I know what you mean, but I'm less concerned about AI of the future than I once was. While I think a lot of people like to paint it as one filled with AI making decisions and doing jobs for us, in reality I think they're more likely to augment us, so they will do the busy work, which lets doctors and the like perform the more complicated, human parts of their profession.

If we all stopped having to do paperwork it would save a lot of messing around. 
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
8/24/2016 | 12:43:15 PM
Data overload?
It strikes me that the more complex the data, the harder it becomes for humans to "eyeball it".  That said, I still don't think I want an AI to perform my next medical exam.


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