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The Future Datacenter Comes With Fries
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englishmdp
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englishmdp,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2013 | 11:47:13 AM
Re: Future of IT
Agreed - but equally, no-one should want to willingly act like an ostrich....and planning and awareness are good career guidance tools!

   
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2013 | 11:17:33 AM
Re: Future of IT
Englishmdp, I think you are probably right on the corporate level. Most IT departments will focus much more on how technology can make their business run most efficiently, and the nuts and bolts of how that works on a daily basis will be subsumed within products and services. I worry that our technical readers will be threatened by that, so I always want to point out that technical positions will still exist. But I agree with you that many of those will move somplace else. Either to service providers or vendors that are supplying the technology, in most cases.
englishmdp
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englishmdp,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 7:47:14 PM
Re: Future of IT
You make an excellent point about the leap-frog and never-ending cycles. And I like your phrasing - the tools get simpler for sure, but the job of IT does not! Thanks for the comment  
englishmdp
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englishmdp,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 7:45:37 PM
Re: But who owns the Infrastructure
I can only say that I agree!
englishmdp
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englishmdp,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 7:44:12 PM
Re: The data center is a value meal
I'm glad you enjoyed the piece - I often think simple analogies can cut through a lot of confusion. The early adopters will, I think, be a function of individual and corporate attitudes rather than of particular workloads or industry verticals. We are already seeing the uptake of integrated systems occuring and I suspect - as I say - that the Data Center of the future will look a lot more like a rack (or racks)that you buy and use - cloud connected of course in most cases - than a building that you construct, fill and conduct science-projects in.  
englishmdp
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englishmdp,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 7:37:54 PM
Re: Future of IT
Thanks for your comment. Indeed, I wasn't trying to imply the death knell of technical support! I was simply trying to use a strong statement to complete the analogy to personal computing and to point out that the balance of IT's role and efforts will tip (I believe dramatically) to delivering bsuiness value rather than delivering a working system. The latter is of course critical but will be more a function of the integrated platforms and so will consume less IT time.  
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
11/20/2013 | 1:03:14 AM
Re: Future of IT
Yes. The tools may become more standardized, but jobs IT professionals will need to do will become ever more complex. The complexity may then call for more changes in the tools, until the standards can be expanded to encompass the changes that were successful and/or widely adapted. The never-ending cycle.
kmarko
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kmarko,
User Rank: Strategist
11/19/2013 | 12:40:19 PM
But who owns the Infrastructure
Not only will IT infrastructure become more bundled and 'normalized' into consistent product categories and sizes, much like standard-sized consumer products (think soft drinks, cereal, soup cans, ...), but the infrastructure itself will be owned and operated by someone else, not IT. Whether it's a multi-tenant cloud like AWS or a hybrid private instance like Salesforce.com's new Superpods (dedicated infrastructure run by and from a Salesforce DC), IT will increasingly be out of the business of running data centers and associated servers, storage and networks.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
11/19/2013 | 10:19:08 AM
The data center is a value meal
I have to confess, Mark. Your analogy equating the datacenter of the future to a MacDonald's value meal is intriguing! But your arguments are also very compelling "evidenced by "software-defined X, Y, and Z," "convergence," "integrated stacks," and cloud versions of -- and extensions to -- everything." plus modularization which seems to me to be a game-changer. Who are -- or will be -- the early adopters and what will the data center of the future look like?

 

 

 
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/19/2013 | 9:59:29 AM
Future of IT
Mark, thanks for the very insightful -- and entertaining -- piece. I think you are right that IT will increasingly become something businesses order off the shelf, or as a service, for that matter. But I'm not sure about the statement that "business IT will become more of a tool, and less of an occupation." Perhaps the IT folks won't be doing the exact same things, but the role of technology is expanding so much in every aspect of business that I think there will still be plenty of places left for technical workers at both the strategic and troubleshooting levels. Other thoughts?


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