Salesforce's 'Superpod': Only For Giants - InformationWeek

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Salesforce's 'Superpod': Only For Giants
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 2:00:05 PM
Re: Doing The Math
So no mini-pods for the midsize enterprise or nonprofit crowd? Hmm. Maybe later.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
11/21/2013 | 1:31:32 PM
Re: Multi-tenant, or just a big single tenant?
Good point, I am not totally convinced that a Superpod is more secure then the public Cloud (and if done right, I am normally of the view that the public Cloud is more safe then in-house) however, I do realize that a Superpod can help to meet regulations and the price to pay for meeting these regulations are inactivity and low utilization during holidays etc.

What about the foreign markets? Do you feel that governments around the world will also line up to buy Superpod?

 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
11/21/2013 | 1:13:57 PM
Re: Doing The Math
Exactly, as the math speaks for itself. On average 40,000 customers per pod, gives each customer the benefits of being on a system that has tapped into the benefits of economies of scale. Next if an organization is equivalent to 40,000 customers then sure buy a Superpod, but if it is far behind that scale then buying a Superpod can be viewed as "because the government has one, I want one" which does not fit into any proper model. 
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
11/21/2013 | 12:36:49 PM
Multi-tenant, or just a big single tenant?
That's a good clarification of the announcement, Doug. Marc Benioff is correct when he says a large customer, such as the U.S. government, will have many users. For such a large customer, Salesforce can establish a "pod," which at one time referred to a standard shipping container crammed full of servers, disks and switching gear. It was a pod because it was an independent unit, it had its power supply and you plugged it in and all the servers lit up. Today, Benioff is probably referring to a section of a data center that has its own power supply and secure communications links, or even a location purpose built for a large customer. I can't tell for sure. One place where the integrity of the terminology seems to be slipping is multi-tenant. Yes, the U.S. government has many users and many users will be found on a single SaaS application of a "SuperPod." But the U.S. government per se is a single tenant. If you combined retailers with the U.S. government, then you would have multi-tenants with different use patterns. Retail is extremely active around the holidays when government workers get extended holidays. Multi-tenancy leads to higher overall utliization in the cloud, etc. Salesforce.com's embrace of Oracle seems to have mysteriously lead to a dilution of its former pioneering cloud definitions. What you might be able to defend with multiple agency use by the U.S.government begins to look more like single tenancy when you get to HP and other single tenant, albeit large, users.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 12:03:28 PM
Doing The Math
Benioff talked about "care, maintenance and white-glove treatment," but he didn't get into a lot of details about the capacity of a Superpod. At last count I think Saleforce had more than 600,000 customers across 15 pods. That's 40,000 per pod, though it's surely the case that one pod might handle 100,000 SMBs where another might handle 5,000 large enterprises.

There was no talk of making fractions of Superpods available and you get the sense that Salesforce really wants to keep this to a selective offering. The more variation you introduce in a data center, the greater the opportunity for mixups and failures. Superpod sounds like the simplest option Salesforce.com could come up with to accommodate dedicated instances.


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