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Acer Touchscreen Chromebook Aims Low
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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
12/6/2013 | 10:39:15 AM
Re: Interesting but ...
This article makes a good point about the storage difference between the Pixel and the new Acer. I wonder if storage will be more important than speed/power. Kurt notes that people increasingly use a smartphone as their main appliance, but a lot of these gadgets soak up huge amounts of storage for images and other media. 
lynn daugherty
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lynn daugherty,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/6/2013 | 10:02:55 AM
Re: Interesting but ...
I am not an IT professional, but a heavy user and fan.  Without a tool to connect to physical or virtual MS machines on a work network remotely through Terminal Gateway, I don't see businesses using these.  I would much rather save my money in a BYOD environment and buy a chromebook, but if I cannot connect to my work server to do work, it does me no good. I recently had to replace my 10 yearold MacBook with n ASUS Windows * machine to be able to work remotely.
kmarko
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kmarko,
User Rank: Strategist
12/5/2013 | 1:25:23 PM
Re: Interesting but ...
I'm not a big enterprise, but anyone who's read my columns over the past year might know that my primary work environment is Chrome OS (for writing and research) and iOS and Android for communication. The need for a conventional PC is vastly overrated, particularly by the older generation weened on them. Forget the PC sales figures, just look at mobile device usage among youth (teens, 20's). They are fueling the tablet sales boom this holiday season and use a smartphone as their primary information appliance. 

As to "real", read enterprise use of Chrome, it's already happening, with case studies here for Chrome OS and here for Google Apps (the gateway drug to a Chrome-centric environment). What people still have trouble wrapping their heads around is the compute power issue. In a cloud-centric model, even today's low-end device has plenty of power to manage this UI and graphics as evidenced by the SoCs used in smartphones and tablets. All the heavy lifting is done in the cloud. Doing some sophisticated image transformations with a Aviary? You don't actually think those filters are happening on your Chromebook do you? No, they're done on an EC2 or GCE instance, i.e. virtual Xeon with multi-GB of RAM. This performance asymmetry will only grow as cloud compute instances get more powerful and cheaper (see Google's recent GCE pricing and spec announcement).

 
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
12/5/2013 | 11:56:59 AM
Interesting but ...
I could see something like this working for my middle school kids -- they want a keyboard for writing, but they need a touchscreen for some of the apps (7th grader was studying Spanish last night using a touchscreen matching game of Spanish to English terms.) They don't need high powered computing or a glam screen, and the abuse it'll take frankly you want a disposable price. I'm less convinced for business computing needs. Anyone see it working in their environments?


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