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6 Robots To Inspire Google
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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2014 | 4:50:23 PM
Now Nest
Adding intrigue to Google's purchase of Boston Dynamics's robots is news that Google is payting $3.2 billion to acquire Nest Labs.  Here's more in case you missed it: http://add.vc/huS
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
12/18/2013 | 8:09:57 PM
Re: Where Google Brings Robots
That's soe strange double-speak that Googls is talking. It sounds like Boston Dynamics is making lots of money from government contracts. And Google isn't going to just sever its ties with the government because of this acquistion.

I expect them to continue selling these robots to the government. The money is just too good. 
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2013 | 7:56:21 PM
Re: Why Boston Dynamics?
The driverless car comparison seems right, Wyatt. And if you want to map the entire earth, you need to leave the road. Perhaps these can do some of that work by foot. 
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2013 | 7:18:04 PM
Re: Why Boston Dynamics?
Just guessing, but the autonomous nature of Boston Dynamics's robots actually align with what Google has been doing with its self-driving car: testing how quickly and correctly automated vehicles (and now maybe robots) can adapt to changing surroundings.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2013 | 4:38:20 PM
Re: Why do so many robots look like humans?
It's not just ego. Given an environment designed for humans, there are advantages to designing robots like people. Stairs and wheels don't always place nicely together.
Alenka
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Alenka,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/17/2013 | 2:10:27 PM
Why Boston Dynamics?
It seems Google is more interested in Boston Dynamics' animal-like robots that exhibit mobility, agility, dexterity and speed. The human-like Atlas robot is impressive, but it's unclear how it could be useful to Google. The company has surprised in the past though, and it'll be interesting to see what it has planned with all these acquisitions of robotics companies.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2013 | 12:03:29 PM
Why do so many robots look like humans?
Humans are an egotistical lot. Why do most of the robots in this collection -- and most robots in general -- look like humans. Here we are making machines in our own image, but the human form seems like an unlikely design. It's a top-heavy form that's intrinsically unsteady on its feet. If you're starting with metal, plastic and other man-made materials rather than flesh and bones, would you use the human body as a design point? Google's robots at least look like they are designed to the task.  
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2013 | 10:45:02 AM
Where Google Brings Robots
These military-grade robots present a stark contrast to the Google driverless car. What can Google do with these types of technologies in tandem?


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