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Deadly Downtime: The Worst Network Outages Of 2013
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samicksha
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samicksha,
User Rank: Strategist
12/26/2013 | 2:59:38 AM
Re: Plan B
@J_Brandt: I understand your point, but i guess this increase your total IT expense as keeping data local and in the cloud will ask for good money in hand.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2013 | 12:42:58 AM
Re: Nothing Compares to Life
Alison, 

". . . whenever 911 or hospitals systems go black, people can actually die. And that cannot be measured on a balance sheet."

True. Unfortunately, it seems like the first worry most people have is about how much companies have lost in a thirty-minute outage. 

An outage in a hospital without a good emergency backup system might be used as a wake up call after they lose some patients for this. Saving money in not having a proper emergency system can be costly in human lives. 

-Susan 
aditshar
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aditshar,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/25/2013 | 5:24:28 AM
Re: Plan B
I guess the Dad of worst outage 2013 was Healthcare.gov, wherein It wasn't just a matter of a single downtime incident, it was a series of hard outages and an ongoing soft outage in which the site was barely functional.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2013 | 3:54:19 PM
Re: Plan B
So, Amazon lost $30-40 million from being down 30-40 minutes? That means every ten minutes, the company makes $10 million. Or, roughly $1 million per minute. Can you imagine the cost that would be incurred if the site went down during the holiday season?

I wonder how many IT pros are on call during this time of year for Amazon. 
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2013 | 1:12:49 PM
No network, no cloud
These are only the bigger network outages, there is plenty of others. Having entire businesses rely on cloud services does not sound like that good of an idea. While cloud services have merit, we enjoy a badly maintained infrastructure that lags behind compared to the networks available in Europe while paying way more for service. Maybe priorities need shift from quarterly numbers to long term gain, but I doubt that will ever happen.
Alison Diana
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Alison Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
12/24/2013 | 11:32:02 AM
Nothing Compares to Life
When emergency services go down, we really recognize how invaluable and critical our networks are. Money is, of course, important. In addition to its face value, jobs rest on dollars, yen, pounds, and euros. But whenever 911 or hospitals systems go black, people can actually die. And that cannot be measured on a balance sheet. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
12/24/2013 | 10:29:48 AM
Re: Plan B
That redundancy makes a lot of sense to me! Thanks.
J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2013 | 10:28:33 AM
Re: Plan B
A combination of those two - depending on the type of data.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
12/24/2013 | 10:24:41 AM
Re: Plan B
J-Brandt -- Is your Plan B a local data option as a redundancy to cloud storage. Or are you saying you prefer keeping all data local? 
J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2013 | 10:10:36 AM
Plan B
This is why I like my Plan B – local data.  There are so many advantages to cloud solutions, but only if you can always get there.  From the office you have little issue, from mobile devices, you are influenced by location, load, weather, and where you are in the building.
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