Comments
LinkedIn Privacy: 5 Safety Tips
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/19/2014 | 3:28:11 PM
weird connection requests
I can't be the only one who worries when the volume goes up for connection requests that seem "off" in some way.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
2/19/2014 | 10:11:04 AM
Re: Hasn't LinkedIn been relatively trouble-free?
For that matter, the info that you willingly publish about your background, career and connections can be used in social engineering tricks. No IT-level hacking required.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
2/19/2014 | 7:58:09 AM
Re: Hasn't LinkedIn been relatively trouble-free?
Totally agree, Kristin. The fact that you don't buy things on LinkedIn makes it less of an economic risk. But there is a lot of personal information -- your resume, work history, recommendations from colleagues -- which could be used by a clever cyber crook to trick people into revealing information through social engineering. 
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
2/18/2014 | 8:05:59 PM
Re: Hasn't LinkedIn been relatively trouble-free?
You could argue that there's less of a risk with a site like LinkedIn -- you don't likely have personal pictures or sensitive credit card information, for example. But as Marilyn mentioned, no site impermeable. Better safe than sorry.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/18/2014 | 6:41:38 PM
Re: Hasn't LinkedIn been relatively trouble-free?
I'm surprised LinkedIn doesn't use HTTPS by default. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
2/18/2014 | 4:54:25 PM
Re: Hasn't LinkedIn been relatively trouble-free?
Not so trouble-free, Dave. LinkedIn was hacked in June 2012 when passwords for nearly 6.5 million user accounts were stolen by Russian cybercriminals. And again last fall along with Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Twitter and 93,000 other websites where hackers stole usernames and passwords for nearly 2 million accounts.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
2/18/2014 | 4:21:11 PM
Hasn't LinkedIn been relatively trouble-free?
I've never thought of LinkedIn as being as much of a security hazard as Facebook (although I've rarely had problems with FB either).

Aside from the app mentioned in the article as a potential hazard, have there been any significant patterns of problems with LinkedIn privacy? Maybe it's just that I don't try very hard to protect my privacy on LinkedIn - strikes me as a place where you want to be found. Aside from the occasional spam connection request, I have few complaints.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/18/2014 | 2:59:05 PM
Great tips
In this day and age it is very easy to use LinkedIn, whether to connect with professionals or find discussion groups that focus on a specific topic, etc. All this ease can turn into a headache fairly quickly, if proper security and privacy measures are not employed by users. I just hope more people stop using passwords such as "123456" or any other passwords that's non-secure.


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