Microsoft Investigating Windows Zero-Day Bug - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
News
News
3/29/2007
04:38 PM
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
[Dark Reading Crash Course] Finding & Fixing Application Security Vulnerabilitie
Sep 14, 2017
Hear from a top applications security expert as he discusses key practices for scanning and securi ...Read More>>

Microsoft Investigating Windows Zero-Day Bug

Microsoft is working on a patch for the bug that uses Internet Explorer as its main attack vector, and affects all the recent Windows releases, including Vista.

Microsoft Corp. has confirmed a new Windows zero-day bug that is already being targeted by attackers.

The vulnerability lies in the way Windows handles malformed animated cursor files and could enable a hacker to remotely take control of an infected system. The bug affects all the recent Windows releases, including its highly-touted Vista operating system. Internet Explorer is the main attack vector for the exploits.

Microsoft said in its advisory that researchers are working on a patch for the bug.

"In order for this attack to be carried out, a user must either visit a Web site that contains a Web page that is used to exploit the vulnerability, view a specially crafted e-mail message, or opening a specially crafted e-mail attachment sent to them by an attacker," Adrian Stone, a Microsoft researcher said in a blog. "While the attack appears to be targeted and not widespread, we are monitoring the issue and will update the Advisory and blog as new information becomes available."

Maarten Van Horenbeeck, a handler with the Internet Storm Center, reported on their site that they have spotted domains hosting malicious code that would exploit this vulnerability. And Craig Schmugar, a researcher at McAfee, said on his blog that McAfee analysts are seeing malicious exploit samples, as well.

"Preliminary tests demonstrate that Internet Explorer 6 and 7 running on a fully patched Windows XP SP2 are vulnerable to this attack," Schmugar wrote, adding that known exploits download and execute arbitrary .exe files. "Exploitation happens completely silently."

TrendMicro posted an advisory warning that a Trojan, named Anicmoo.ax, which is exploiting this bug, may get into a system in the form of a specially-crafted animated cursor (.ANI) file downloaded from the Internet by unsuspecting users. It may also arrive as a file embedded in HTML e-mail messages.

Microsoft said in its advisory that it has added detection to the Windows Live OneCare safety scanner for up-to-date removal of malicious software that attempts to exploit this vulnerability.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2017 State of IT Report
In today's technology-driven world, "innovation" has become a basic expectation. IT leaders are tasked with making technical magic, improving customer experience, and boosting the bottom line -- yet often without any increase to the IT budget. How are organizations striking the balance between new initiatives and cost control? Download our report to learn about the biggest challenges and how savvy IT executives are overcoming them.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll