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Best Buy: No Mail-In Rebate For Palm Pre Here!

Best Buy announced that it will be selling the Palm Pre on launch day June 6, too. It made sure to point out that the $100 mail-in rebate won't be required at Best Buy, where the Pre really will cost $200 out-of-pocket. Also, if you want the Pre sans contract, be prepared to shell out some big bucks.
Best Buy announced that it will be selling the Palm Pre on launch day June 6, too. It made sure to point out that the $100 mail-in rebate won't be required at Best Buy, where the Pre really will cost $200 out-of-pocket. Also, if you want the Pre sans contract, be prepared to shell out some big bucks.Here's the relevant passage from Best Buy's press release: "Without the hassle of mail-in rebates, Best Buy Mobile allows consumers to buy with instant rebate savings at the point of purchase."

One word: Nice!

If you're planning to purchase a Palm Pre on the June 6 launch, I'd highly recommend you save yourself the hassle of dealing with the mail-in rebate and buy at the closest Best Buy rather than Sprint retailer. Best Buy will only charge you $200 when you buy the phone. At Sprint stores, you'll have to pay $300. You'll eventually get $100 back in the mail from Sprint, but only if you remember to submit the rebate.

Best Buy Mobile President Shawn Score said in a prepared statement, "The addition of the Palm Pre to our assortment gives consumers the opportunity to see all of the latest and greatest mobile phone technology under one roof. Our vast selection of smartphones allows customers to see which device is right for their individual needs. They can also check to see if they are eligible for an upgrade, no matter what carrier they're currently using."

Another interesting tidbit. The full, unsubsidized retail price has been spotted, as well. It will cost you a whopping $550 if you buy it sans contract.

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