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Emoze Offering Free Mobile Push E-Mail And Calendar

Emoze has offered a free alternative to enterprise-level push mail and calendaring for some time now. Though the software runs on Symbian, Windows Mobile, and Windows Smartphone, it's been previously unavailable to Java-based mobile users. That's changed with the updated version, which includes support for the latest Java technology and thus expands the service to another 800-plus devices.
Emoze has offered a free alternative to enterprise-level push mail and calendaring for some time now. Though the software runs on Symbian, Windows Mobile, and Windows Smartphone, it's been previously unavailable to Java-based mobile users. That's changed with the updated version, which includes support for the latest Java technology and thus expands the service to another 800-plus devices.Emoze is using the new Java LightWeight User Interface Toolkit (LWUIT) for its push-communications technology. LWUIT provides users with a clean Web-like interface to their e-mail, calendar, and contacts across all supported platforms. A big complaint coming from mobile e-mail users has been the fact that mobile-based reading was so difficult and cumbersome. Emoze addresses this by displaying your information in a familiar Outlook-style queue, which users will appreciate. In the future, the company plans to introduce social networking utilities, as part of its push-content service to provide an all-in-one mobile content solution, free of charge. Managing your personal, business, and social contacts and communication from any mobile device while keeping everything centrally updated and current is a huge benefit to the well-connected consumer. It all works by downloading a small application to your PC, either at home or at work, and configuring it for your e-mail, calendar, or contacts. It then sits in your system tray, constantly communicating with your e-mail servers and pushing the data to your mobile device. The app will run in any home or corporate environment regardless of security and firewall limitations. The PC utility connects to a central Emoze Global Service Network, which is a globally accessible network infrastructure that makes it possible to manage connections to multiple carriers and networks, using a single PC Connector. A simple mobile client communicates with the EGSN server to authenticate and retrieve your information anytime, anywhere. Emoze is truly a mass-device push-communication service, and one of the only ones that's still free of charge. The updated version, which includes the addition of Java compatibility, launches next month.

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