Energy Star PCs: Not A Heap Of Green To Be Saved - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile
Commentary
7/27/2007
04:46 PM
Chris Murphy
Chris Murphy
Commentary
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Energy Star PCs: Not A Heap Of Green To Be Saved

Buying Energy Star PCs is the right thing to do for the environment. Some companies take that responsibility seriously. But at companies only concerned about saving money, the EPA's brand new energy-efficiency requirements won't dazzle the accountants.

Buying Energy Star PCs is the right thing to do for the environment. Some companies take that responsibility seriously. But at companies only concerned about saving money, the EPA's brand new energy-efficiency requirements won't dazzle the accountants.We did a big story on Green Computing this year ("What Every Tech Pro Should Know About Green Computing"), and the takeaway was that companies want cost savings, not just a feel-good, eco-friendly vibe.

So check my math here. The EPA estimates a company can save $2 to $10 a year in electricity running an Energy Star PC. Assume the typical lifecycle for a business PC is three years-so you're saving $6 to $30 lifetime. Manufacturers tell the EPA the new power supplies will add about $30 to the cost of PCs. So you're lucky to break even. Even stretching the life cycle to five years, the median savings of $30 is about break-even.

This isn't knocking the EPA. Only 20% of computers meet this standard today, so it has raised the bar for PC makers. And the EPA thinks the price of those more efficient power supplies will fall with bulk orders, and there's no reason to believe it won't. So the math should get a bit more compelling. The EPA estimates Energy Star PCs will save companies and individuals $1.8 billion in energy costs the next five years.

But for IT buyers, the Energy Star requirements could end up being about a wash on upfront cost versus energy savings. Hopefully that'll be enough to convince most companies to buy based on energy efficiency. And even more important, let's hope PC makers don't settle for the Energy Star standard when it comes to energy efficiency, and they'll deliver even higher electricity savings.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
10 Top Cloud Computing Startups
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  8/3/2020
Commentary
Adding Fuel to the MSP vs. In-house IT Debate
Andrew Froehlich, President & Lead Network Architect, West Gate Networks,  8/6/2020
Commentary
How Enterprises Can Adopt Video Game Cloud Strategy
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/28/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
2020 State of DevOps Report
2020 State of DevOps Report
Download this report today to learn more about the key tools and technologies being utilized, and how organizations deal with the cultural and process changes that DevOps brings. The report also examines the barriers organizations face, as well as the rewards from DevOps including faster application delivery, higher quality products, and quicker recovery from errors in production.
Video
Current Issue
Enterprise Automation: Do More with Less
In this IT Trend Report, we highlight the benefits of automation and the various tools as enterprises navigate turbulent times, try to do more with less, keep their operations running, and stay on track with digital modernizations.
Slideshows
Flash Poll