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EU To Lock Horns With Apple Over iPhone Battery

The European Union is considering new legislation that would make it mandatory for electronic devices to have removable batteries. Apple already has taken flack -- and even suffered a lawsuit -- over the non-user-replaceable battery in the iPhone. As Michael Buffer would say, "Let's get ready to rumble!"
The European Union is considering new legislation that would make it mandatory for electronic devices to have removable batteries. Apple already has taken flack -- and even suffered a lawsuit -- over the non-user-replaceable battery in the iPhone. As Michael Buffer would say, "Let's get ready to rumble!"One of the many complaints levied against both the original and 3G iPhones are that the battery -- much like an iPod's -- is built into the device and cannot be accessed by the user. For devices such as MP3 players, it may not seem like a big deal, but users of mobile phones often want -- make that need -- the ability to carry more than one battery for their phones and replace it should one go dead during the course of the day.

With the iPhone, there is no such luck. All you can do is pray to the battery gods that your rechargeable unit will get you through the day without draining entirely.

The European Union, not singling out Apple, but rather focusing on the issue of recycling, is set to change the laws regarding the accessibility of rechargeable batteries.

According to Apple Insider, "the 'New Batteries Directive' now being drafted ... goes even further to state that electrical equipment must be designed to allow that batteries be 'readily removed' for replacement or removal at the end of product's life."

The goal of the directive is so that the batteries of phones and other devices that have reached the end of their useful lives can be pulled out and recycled rather than tossed into a landfill. The law is not meant to vex Apple and force it to make changes or adaptations to its products.

But that could be the net result if the legislation is passed.

If it does, end users could benefit.

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