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Forecast Says Money To Be Made In Mobile Security

IDC released a new forecast that names the mobile device security software sector as a hot prospect for businesses to explore. Security services already bring in $200 million in revenue today and will only continue to rake in the cash as more and more enterprises figure out they should be prote
IDC released a new forecast that names the mobile device security software sector as a hot prospect for businesses to explore. Security services already bring in $200 million in revenue today and will only continue to rake in the cash as more and more enterprises figure out they should be protecting their assets.The importance of security can't be hammered home enough. With the number of enterprise devices that go missing each year on the rise, using even the most basic security features, such as keypad locks, can help save money, time, and reputation.

With smartphones, PDAs, and laptops walking in and out of the office every day, IT departments are presented with an increasing number of challenges to protect those assets.

IDC research analyst Stacy Sudan said, "For most enterprises today, device-based security, such as device wipe/lock and encryption of the data on the device, are the most important features that a mobile security solution must contain. But in the future, secure content and threat management features like mobile firewall, mobile VPN, and mobile antivirus will begin to gain increased importance for companies seeking to secure further aspects of enterprise mobility."

It's with this in mind that IDC conjured up its forecasts, which basically say: The mobile security business is a good one to be in right now.

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Samuel Greengard, Contributing Reporter
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Jessica Davis, Senior Editor
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek
Carrie Pallardy, Contributing Reporter
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Astrid Gobardhan, Data Privacy Officer, VFS Global
Sara Peters, Editor-in-Chief, InformationWeek / Network Computing