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Google's 'Mail Goggles' Set To Be Your E-Mail Wingman

Every so often Google adds something new to Google Labs, where it tests nonfinal versions of software that may or may not become a standard feature. The latest is called Mail Goggles -- a play on "beer goggles" -- that just might save your tail when it comes to e-mail.
Every so often Google adds something new to Google Labs, where it tests nonfinal versions of software that may or may not become a standard feature. The latest is called Mail Goggles -- a play on "beer goggles" -- that just might save your tail when it comes to e-mail.Everyone has probably done it. Late at night, clouded by fatigue, you send an e-mail to someone that you later wish you could recall. Heaven forbid you send an e-mail after consuming a few alcoholic beverages. That's a recipe for disaster, and one that is all too easy to serve up given the proliferation of smartphones with mobile e-mail capabilities.

You surely remember the term "beer goggles" from when you were in college. You know, the more you drink, the more attractive you are likely to find someone of the opposite sex (even if they aren't). When you were on the prowl, you probably had a wingman or other friend who served as a filter to prevent you from making a mistake when you were wearing your beer goggles.

It's in the spirit of protecting us from our inner e-mail demons that Google engineers brewed up Mail Goggles. Think of Mail Goggles as your new, electronic wingman.

According to The Official Gmail Blog, "When you enable Mail Goggles, it will check that you're really sure you want to send that late night Friday e-mail. And what better way to check than by making you solve a few simple math problems after you click send to verify you're in the right state of mind? By default, Mail Goggles is only active late night on the weekend, as that is the time you're most likely to need it. Once enabled, you can adjust when it's active in the General settings."

I love it.

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