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Google: Some Android Developers Are More Equal Than Other Android Developers

Apparently open doesn't really mean open and equal access means nothing. Despite promises that Android would be an equal opportunity platform for all developers, some are receiving special treatment -- "Animal Farm" style. Android Developer Challenge finalists have been given access to an unreleased version of the SDK that isn't available to all the other developers.
Apparently open doesn't really mean open and equal access means nothing. Despite promises that Android would be an equal opportunity platform for all developers, some are receiving special treatment -- "Animal Farm" style. Android Developer Challenge finalists have been given access to an unreleased version of the SDK that isn't available to all the other developers.Shh. No one was supposed to know. That is, until David McLaughlin, a Google employee, accidentally sent an e-mail to a public Android mailing list that spilled some details about the super-secret unreleased, unavailable version of the Android SDK. Uh. Oops.

Ars Technica reports:


While most of the Android community was forced to use an outdated version of the SDK from February and were left to wonder if they would ever see another SDK release at all, a small assortment of 50 gagged developers were given priority access to much-needed improvements and bug fixes that Google has apparently been keeping secret. This revelation has compelled some to question the search giant's motives and wonder whether Google is really committed to making Android an equal-opportunity platform for enthusiast developers. For many of the critics, Google's secrecy and unwillingness to communicate is ultimately more troubling than the lack of SDK updates.

That's a black eye for ya, Google. How the company can claim to offer an open platform and then prevent the bulk of developers from accessing the latest build of the SDK doesn't wash.

What's the deal, Google? Sure, you want your 50 developer finalists to be able to shine with their applications, but the rest of the developer community, which is toiling (partially) for your benefit, should have equal access to the best-available tools.

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