Google Pledges $1 Million To Special Ed Via Android Pay - InformationWeek
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11/25/2015
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Google Pledges $1 Million To Special Ed Via Android Pay

Google promises to donate $1 for every Android Pay purchase towards special needs education projects. It will donate up to $1 million this holiday season.

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Google is in a giving spirit this holiday season, and you can join in its philanthropic efforts by using Android Pay from now through the end of 2015.

The tech giant has pledged to donate $1 towards special needs education projects for every transaction completed on Android Pay. It plans to donate up to $1 million over the holidays.

Its campaign started Nov. 24 and will run through Dec. 31. On Black Friday (Nov. 27) the per-purchase donation will double, giving Android users another reason to join in the holiday shopping kickoff.

[ Holiday shopping at work? This is what your CIO thinks. ]

There are 6.4 million children in the US education system who have special needs, Google officials wrote in a blog post on the project. Teachers spend nearly $500 out of pocket to outfit their special needs classrooms.

To support classrooms across the country, Google.org and Android Pay have teamed up with DonorsChoose.org for their holiday fundraiser.

While a means of raising money for a worthy cause, this project is also intended to broaden the adoption of Android Pay, Google's mobile payments system. Mobile payments are slowly increasing, but it's difficult to get people enthusiastic about the idea when most see no inconvenience in reaching for their wallets at checkout.

Google's latest charitable campaign makes it easy for Android users to participate in a fundraiser while they do their usual holiday shopping. All they need to do is set up the system on their smartphones.

Android Pay is poised to compete with Apple Pay in the growing mobile payments arena. Like its rival, Android Pay enables customers to tap for payment at the point of sale.

Google announced Sept. 10 its plans to roll out Android Pay to nearly 1 million locations across the U.S. The system works with all NFC Android devices running KitKat 4.4 or higher on smartphones from all mobile carriers.

(Image: Google)

(Image: Google)

At launch time, Android Pay supported American Express, MasterCard, Visa and Discover. Banks including Citibank and Capital One were on a growing list of financial companies planning to get on board.

This campaign is part of the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities project. The initiative aims to spark awareness, find solutions, and create new opportunities for disabled people.

Other efforts through the challenge have supported Veterans Day and the Special Olympics. In September 2015, Google hosted the Bay Area Makeathon to bring together people who understand disabilities with designers, technologists, and makers for the purpose of exchanging ideas, designing prototypes and writing code to help address the challenges of disabled people.

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Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
11/29/2015 | 12:09:07 AM
Re: Google Wimps Out
It is a good cause and at least it is the start of allocating some resources towards individuals that have special requirements.

On average the interchange rate in the US is 1.79 percent. The interchange rate is divided up among many players for instance, the card issuing bank and Visa/MasterCard association. If these players decided to similarly donate $1 on every transaction then, a transaction below $56 would require funds from elsewhere to complete the $1.

The global economy is rapidly evolving and there seems to be a greater number of smartphones in the world than bank accounts. I feel this is the reason that is causing technology firms such as, Google, Apple and Facebook (Facebook Messenger Payments) to seek out collaborative banking partners and collaborative consumers to adopt a newer system.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
11/27/2015 | 1:24:09 PM
Re: Google Wimps Out
At the end of 2014, the free chash flow for Google was reported as $11.42 B

Free cash flow is the money a company can spend free and clear of any payments, for investments, donations, etc.

Just sayin, that's a lot of cash
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
11/27/2015 | 8:01:59 AM
Re: Google Wimps Out
@jastroff, I don't think it can hurt if people would rather donate on their own without purchasing something through Android Pay. The question is, would those customers have voluntarily and independently taken the time to donate to a cause or that specific cause?
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
11/27/2015 | 7:58:33 AM
Re: Google Wimps Out
I like the cause. Every little bit helps, even if it is a ploy to get people to use Android Pay.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
11/25/2015 | 5:43:53 PM
Re: Google Wimps Out
@jastroff you know what they say, the more things change, the more things stay the same.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
11/25/2015 | 5:16:44 PM
Re: Google Wimps Out
So the "new economy" companies are pretty much like the "old economy" companies
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
11/25/2015 | 4:17:04 PM
Re: Google Wimps Out
@jastroff a lot of brands do that -- associate their names with a cause and try to make you feel virtuous about buying their products because a very small part of the proceeds with go to a charity. It's very common, particularly at this time of year. 
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
11/25/2015 | 3:48:50 PM
Google Wimps Out
so tacky on Google's part -- wedging their pay service onto the backs of consumers for a "good cause"? Oh, they should just donate the money, and maybe sweeten the pot with Android Pay later

 

>> The tech giant has pledged to donate $1 towards special needs education projects for every transaction completed on Android Pay. It plans to donate up to $1 million over the holidays.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
11/25/2015 | 1:18:30 PM
all vulnerable groups need ITs help
I was reading an article as well that given the right tools, people with disabilities can flourish and contribute to our society.  I hope more companies support such efforts. I would like to know what Google and other IT companies are doing to hire people with disabilities. We talk a lot about minority and women.  But, people with disabilities are a group that demands our attention as well.
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