8 Must-Have Mobile Tools For Road Warriors - InformationWeek
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1/28/2016
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Kelly Sheridan
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8 Must-Have Mobile Tools For Road Warriors

Remote workers may not need an office, but they do need a few devices to keep them connected and productive. Here are our top picks to keep you and your teams functioning on the go.
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(Image: Bjdlzx/iStockPhoto)

(Image: Bjdlzx/iStockPhoto)

Today's technology lets us work where we want: office buildings, coffee shops, sun-bathed rooftops, living room desks.

Digital tools have made it easier than ever to communicate with colleagues located down the hall or across the globe. For many employees, location has become irrelevant -- what matters is how well you work from wherever you choose to be.

Some employees use the added flexibility to work from home, where they can avoid a lengthy commute and spend more time with family. Others opt to take their jobs on the road so they can travel without sacrificing their income.

[ 11 apps for a healthy and wealthy 2016. ]

I'll be doing the latter beginning next month as a participant with Remote Year, a program that arranges long-term travel for groups of remote employees. In preparing for a year around the world, I've compiled a list of tools that will keep me connected and productive whether I'm in a designated workspace or in transit.

Aside from the obvious laptop and smartphone, I've found there are a few gadgets and accessories worth the investment for employees on the road. Noise-cancelling headphones, high-capacity mobile chargers, and a personal hotspot are a few additions to my mobile toolbox.

Read on to learn about more tools that make remote work "work." Do you use any of these products or have recommendations absent from this list? Suggestions are welcome in the comments section below.

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Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
2/20/2016 | 8:35:17 PM
Re: Looks like a tablet -- but not
@Michelle: Indeed, there are at least four such apps.  blog.neweggbusiness.com/over-easy/how-to-use-your-tablet-as-a-second-monitor/
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2016 | 12:12:28 PM
Re: Looks like a tablet -- but not
@joe good point. Privacy screens are definately a must when working away from the office. 
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2016 | 12:01:40 PM
Re: Looks like a tablet -- but not
I'm sure there's an app that can turn a tablet into a monitor. If not an app, there's a setting somewhere. A tablet might be a better buy than just a portable monitor since it can do so much more than just display information.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
2/9/2016 | 1:01:53 PM
Re: Battery Packs
I don't want to name names here, but I do tend to shy away from batteries through some online retailers that may ship on slow boats from certain countries across the Pacific. Some are good, some have been really bad.

The best third-party batteries I've had experience with come from a national retailer that has both an online store and brick-and-mortar locations. They carry a wide supply of batteries, many of which are store-brand labels made by the bigger manufacturers like E******** and D*******. Some of the batteries are manufactured by their own facilities. This retailer has their main product as part of their name.

I know there are other companies that make good quality batteries. If you look online for news stories about so-called hoverboards, you can see some nightmares about cheaply-made batteries that can't withstand the kind of rough ride novice riders give them. The chemical reactions inside a lithion-ion battery are pretty intense. If the battery is made with sub-standard materials or poor manufacturing quality, it may well destroy the device you are powering.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
2/9/2016 | 12:50:32 PM
Re: Looks like a tablet -- but not
@nasimson: You could always get one of those massive iPhone 6 Pluses!  ;)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
2/9/2016 | 12:49:49 PM
Re: Battery Packs
@jagibbons: Do you find that you tend to stay away from third-party batteries, then?  Or are there particular third-party brands that you trust?
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
2/9/2016 | 9:00:25 AM
Re: Looks like a tablet -- but not
@yalanand: You're onto something. Many a times I felt the need of projecting my phone screen on tablet screen to share with people around me because phone screen can not be shared with two people at the same time no matter how large the phone screen is.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2016 | 10:38:55 AM
Re: Battery Packs
Cheaply or poorly made batteries definitely aren't going to last long. Worse, they risk damaging the hardware to which they are providing power. Batteries tends to be one of those areas where you get what you pay for. At least that's been my experience.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2016 | 10:36:25 AM
Re: Battery Packs

jagibbons true but i think you missread my statement  where it says that its true for not very famous brands. I would also like to add that it holds good for third world countries at least. what is your opinion?

jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2016 | 8:05:03 AM
Re: Battery Packs
Sounds like a fairly pessimistic opinion, nomii. I don't know that most vendors are trying to downplay or hide from battery failure. Battery technology hasn't really progressed at the same rate as computers overall have.

Also, I know there is a direct link between how the user cares for the battery and how long it lasts. If the battery is kept in a hot vehicle routinely, it will die more quickly. Same with freezing temperatures, overcharging, fully draining and a host of other activities that can adversely affect the chemical reactions that occur inside the battery.
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