Microsoft's Mobile Roller-Coaster Ride: 9 Contributing Factors - InformationWeek

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4/28/2016
07:06 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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Microsoft's Mobile Roller-Coaster Ride: 9 Contributing Factors

Microsoft has never excelled in smartphones, but its mobile strategy has taken a turn for the worse. What went wrong, what will come next, and are there signs of hope? Here's a closer look.
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Late To The Game
Microsoft didn't attempt to kick its mobile strategy into high gear until long after Apple and Google had begun to dominate the greatest amount of smartphone marketshare. By the time Redmond launched a mobile OS, it was too late to capture a sufficiently large user base to compete.
By failing to enter the mobile market before or immediately after the iPhone launch, Microsoft set the stage for a long, unsuccessful period of trying to compete with the mobile giants that built their strategies at an early time.
When Microsoft did decide to create a mobile presence, it did so by purchasing Nokia for $7.2 billion in July 2014. The acquisition was considered a mistake by many, and a last-ditch attempt for Redmond to get the boost it needed to make Windows Phone competitive with Android and iOS. Needless to say, it was unsuccessful.
(Image: EdStock/iStockPhoto)

Late To The Game

Microsoft didn't attempt to kick its mobile strategy into high gear until long after Apple and Google had begun to dominate the greatest amount of smartphone marketshare. By the time Redmond launched a mobile OS, it was too late to capture a sufficiently large user base to compete.

By failing to enter the mobile market before or immediately after the iPhone launch, Microsoft set the stage for a long, unsuccessful period of trying to compete with the mobile giants that built their strategies at an early time.

When Microsoft did decide to create a mobile presence, it did so by purchasing Nokia for $7.2 billion in July 2014. The acquisition was considered a mistake by many, and a last-ditch attempt for Redmond to get the boost it needed to make Windows Phone competitive with Android and iOS. Needless to say, it was unsuccessful.

(Image: EdStock/iStockPhoto)

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tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
5/2/2016 | 5:57:26 PM
No compelling reason to use MS Mobile
Microsoft's committment to any mobile platform has been iffy at best. They were late to the PDA market and when they finally came in, their platform was decidedly inferior to Palm. Their apps were never very good and they took up major resources on the devices as compared with Palm (and even Apple for a while way back then). Almost the same thing happened in the smartphone market. They just seemed halfhearted when they joined the party. There is no compelling reason to jump from Android and iOS to MS.
dsangi01
50%
50%
dsangi01,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/29/2016 | 11:52:10 AM
APP Store Weakness is MS downfall
I have owned several Windows Mobile Devices over the years, the latest one being a Lumia 1020 and now a 950. While I love the phone and its features as well as the integration with Windows 10 desktop, the lack of great apps frustrates me on a weekly basis.

My next phone will most probably still be a windows phone but I really hope that MS can entice some of the more main stream APP producer to create APPS for their platform.
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