Samsung Attacks In Patent Case - InformationWeek

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4/22/2014
12:25 PM
Magnus Thordarson
Magnus Thordarson
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Samsung Attacks In Patent Case

Samsung's case against Apple begins; patent infringement complaint against Apple centers on smartphone technology for image storage, video capture, compression, and transmission across devices.

Claims and counterclaims were played out in the courtroom theater of the Apple-Samsung trial in San Jose, Calif., Monday. Samsung rested its defense in the infringement complaint Apple brought against it and immediately dove into its own complaint against Apple. US District Judge Lucy Koh expects witness examination to conclude Friday morning.

Samsung's last witness in defense was Judith Chevalier, a finance and economics professor at Yale University's School of Management. Her testimony was for the most part designed to discredit once more the monetary damages John Hauser of MIT calculated for Apple and last week's testimony of Christopher Vellturo, Apple's expert on damages.

Under the assumption Samsung will be found to have broken patent laws, Chevalier estimated Apple's damages to be approximately $38 million, a mere nuisance for Samsung in comparison with the $2.2 billion Apple is seeking. It was disclosed that Chevalier has also testified for Apple in other court cases about damage remedy.

Read the rest of this story on EE Times.

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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
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4/22/2014 | 7:43:53 PM
Re: Apple versus Samsung again; Fewer patents should be issued
I have doubts that the jury system can adequately assess patents, given their complexity. And the idea that software can be patented is just wrong. It's akin to allowing people to patent instructions like, "Place bread on plate and apply butter."
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
4/22/2014 | 6:13:18 PM
Apple versus Samsung again; Fewer patents should be issued
Samsung is using its own patents to fend off an aggressive attacker. Apple believes patents should protect the company that first produces a successful productization of a technology, even if it's not the inventor of it. The legal system is beginning to agree more and more with that point of view. I wish the inventors got more of a return, not the successful implementers. But for that to happen, there'd have to be more rigorous standards for granting patents in the first place and a much more thorough exploration of prior art when there's a dispute. The weaknesses of the system are being used by the most successful company to attack competitors.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
4/22/2014 | 4:01:35 PM
Litigations is good for consumers
On the one hand, the seemingly neverending parade of IP suits waged by tech heavy hitters such as Apple & Samsung has underscored just how broken the US patent system is, but on the other, these suits will yield positive results for consumers in that the final opinions rendered will incrementally bring down costs since no one entity will have a chokehold on common technologies.
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