Samsung Speeds Up Note 4 Smartphone - InformationWeek

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12/29/2014
10:16 AM
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Samsung Speeds Up Note 4 Smartphone

Samsung cancels Galaxy Alpha, adjusts smartphone lineup just days ahead of the Consumer Electronics Show.

 8 Biggest Tech Disappointments Of 2014
8 Biggest Tech Disappointments Of 2014
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Samsung is making moves to improve its roster of smartphones before CES 2015 kicks off in Las Vegas January 6. The company introduced a faster version of the Note 4 on Monday that will offer blistering wireless speeds. It also decided to discontinue the Galaxy Alpha, which many expected to lead Samsung's handsets into the future.

Samsung confirmed rumors Monday by announcing what it calls the "world's first commercially available LTE Advanced Tri-Band Carrier Aggregation smartphone." In other words, Samsung has swapped out the modem inside the Galaxy Note 4 for a much, much faster one. The new modem can support three LTE links of either 20 MHz or 40 MHz. This improvement alone boosts the theoretical download speeds to an impressive 300 Mbit/s.

To put those speeds into perspective, Note 4 owners will be able to download a 700-MB video file in about 19 seconds, or 40 MB of music files in about 1 second. Samsung, however, took the Note 4 a step further: It also tossed LTE Category 9 into the mix. Category 9 LTE supports even faster downlink speeds, up to a scorching 450 Mbit/s. Of course, this assumes such powerful wireless networks exist. They don't, at least not yet.

Korea's SK Telecom recently said it will offer LTE with tri-band Carrier Aggregation with 300-Mbit/s speeds beginning in 2015, but few (if any) other carriers have spelled out such plans. None of the US wireless network operators have made such commitments, that's for certain.

[New year, new phone? See 5 Best Smartphones Of 2014.]

Samsung did not immediately say when the new and improved Note 4 will go on sale, or how much (more) it will cost when compared to the standard model. The Note 4 has been available in the US since October. It sells for $250-$300 with a contract.

Samsung Galaxy Note 4
Samsung Galaxy Note 4

In separate news, it appears as though Samsung is set to discontinue the Galaxy Alpha after just a few months. Samsung first announced the Alpha in August, and it represented a sea change for Samsung. The company used the device as a proof-of-concept, it seems, to see how people would react to new design language. Samsung ditched the much-maligned plastic designs of the Galaxy S series and crafted a fine handset with an aluminum frame. It was a high-end device with a high-end price tag. Apparently the high cost is what placed the Galaxy Alpha on its deathbed.

According to ETNews, Samsung will phase out the Galaxy Alpha in favor of the Galaxy A5. The A5 is similar in design, but loses the top-tier specs and top-tier price tag. Where the Alpha cost more than $600, the A5 is closer to $360. Samsung is waiting for supplies of the Alpha to be exhausted before making the change official.

Both announcements arrive mere days before CES 2015. Samsung is scheduled to hold a press conference January 5. The company typically uses CES as a platform to show off new TVs and refrigerators, and rarely debuts new smartphones. Samsung is said to be hard at work on the Galaxy S6, which should arrive no later than early March.

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Eric is a freelance writer for InformationWeek specializing in mobile technologies. View Full Bio

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Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
1/1/2015 | 7:05:40 AM
Re: Quick leasson learned
Meijac,

The Smarter,More Innovative Companies have figured this out as part of their Business Strategies.

With RIM;this is what seems to be happening today-Complete Overhaul of their Product Base ;Real Question is whether that overhaul will be sufficient to keep them in Business two-three years from now.

RIM's Strength was always the Corporate Market and the moment they fix that (focus there) ;they should do well(atleast that's my hope).

 
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2014 | 3:41:45 PM
Re: Quick leasson learned
@Ashu001,

Thank you for the insight and reply :)

So I would ask if companies forsee this as part of the business plan? or simply a contingency when the numbers don't reach the mark?

And for companies like Blackberry, I wasn't simply clearing inventory, it ment a complete overhall on there end
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
12/30/2014 | 12:26:37 PM
Re: Quick leasson learned
Meijac,

That's why Companies organize Flash Sales/Crash Sales!

They offer the same Outdated Product for 30% less(sometimes even Higher Discounts) to clear Inventory.

In some rare cases(I am not sure if it happens for most Samsung Products today) the Company also goes ahead and Scraps the entire lot rather than sell it on the Market(&Risj Damage to their Brand Reputation).

Yes on the Balance Sheet it is declared as a Loss eventually.

 

 
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
12/29/2014 | 3:11:35 PM
Re: Quick leasson learned
As a follow up to my previus comment, and question to the community, how do providers deal with the inventory when companies decide to no longer support a product?

The Samsung Alpha came out a few months ago...most providers get enought inventory to satify projected demand... so when that forecast goes out the window...what do they do? do they return it? declare it as a loss?
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
12/29/2014 | 3:07:56 PM
Quick leasson learned
Wow!! I don't think there are many examples of companies discountinuing after only a few months in the market, but in the market world of tablets/smartphones, if you don't hit the mark in the first 90 days, changes are you're not getting very far (the Amazon Fire is a clear example of when you hit the mark).

If Samsung was clear that the Alpha was a proof of concept, then ok, they get a pass. But if the folks in there R&D were truly betting on it's success....well...let's say that department got overturned.

Microsoft has had a similar experience with the Surface, where the Surface 3 is a clear departure of what they were aiming for at the beginning.

So let's see what Samsung ends up doing
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