Sprint Beefs Up Network For iPhone - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Devices
Commentary
11/30/2011
11:50 PM
Ed Hansberry
Ed Hansberry
Commentary
50%
50%

Sprint Beefs Up Network For iPhone

Carrier takes action to remedy users' reports of subpar smartphone speeds.

The iPhone launched on the Sprint network October 14 and generated the best sales day ever in the history of the carrier. The launch wasn't without some glitches, though, as some users reported connectivity issues. Sprint has come through and, just six weeks after the launch, is taking corrective action.

According to Cnet, consumer response to the fixes has been positive. "Sprint continues to monitor device and network performance to ensure that customers get the performance they expect from our products," said Sprint VP of product development Fared Adib.

When the iPhone launched on AT&T in 2007, data issues plagued the carrier for years, with the problems only recently being addressed with network upgrades. AT&T's issues though seemed to involve dropped calls and an inability to get online, especially in areas with a lot of iPhone users.

Sprint's problems mostly involve slow data speeds. Sprint's iPhone uses the old EVDO technology and generally downloads in the 480-kbps range, according to tests run by PCMag.com. Users, though, reported speeds in the 200-kbps range. That is enough to make basic video streaming unbearable, and downloading apps or large email attachments becomes enough of a pain you'd be inclined to put it off until you can get to a Wi-Fi hotspot. Some reported speeds as low as 70 kpbs, which puts it squarely in the 2G speed range.

At those speeds not only are some features painful to use, Siri becomes a problem. Sending your voice command to Apple's server for a response requires more bandwidth than 70 kbps.

It is a hassle when you buy a new device that performs substantially below expectations. Smartphones are designed to consume lots of data, but when speeds are limited like this it is about as enjoyable as getting a nice thick homemade milkshake and having to suck it through a cocktail straw.

To Sprint's credit though, it acknowledged the issue very early rather than trying to bury it, and once identified, it rolled out fixes quickly. Not everyone is satisfied yet, but at least it looks like progress is being made.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Jiffy2010
50%
50%
Jiffy2010,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/6/2011 | 2:04:37 AM
re: Sprint Beefs Up Network For iPhone
I am a Sprint iPhone 4S customer and can attest to Sprint's quick reaction to the data speed issue. I had an alert show up yesterday on my Online account letting me know of planned system upgrades in my area, by tower, which provided details on exactly what type of upgrade was coming, and by when.

Where I live, Sprint 3G coverage is great. I haven't had any data speed issues at all on my unlimited 3G plan. When I flew through Chicago O'Hare, the iPhone was barely useable (data wise). No telling how many other Sprint customers were saturating the cell tower by the airport, but it was painfully obvious that there wasn't enough cell bandwidth to go around.

I hope they are quick to upgrade their network to keep up with the data demand of the iPhone. I replaced my Android phone with the 4S and just ordered a 4S for another line on my account, replacing another Android device.

No cell carrier is perfect, but Sprint is trying really hard to stay relevant in the U.S. cell phone market, and I am a satisfied customer of their service.
Slideshows
10 RPA Vendors to Watch
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  8/20/2019
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Digital Transformation
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  8/13/2019
Slideshows
IT Careers: How to Get a Job as a Site Reliability Engineer
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  7/31/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Data Science and AI in the Fast Lane
This IT Trend Report will help you gain insight into how quickly and dramatically data science is influencing how enterprises are managed and where they will derive business success. Read the report today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll