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New Policies For Windows Phone Marketplace

Microsoft has released new guidelines for developers to get programs into its application store, now dubbed Windows Phone Marketplace. A number of the new policies should attract a few more developers than the previous rules without having the store cluttered with junk designed to increase the app count.
Microsoft has released new guidelines for developers to get programs into its application store, now dubbed Windows Phone Marketplace. A number of the new policies should attract a few more developers than the previous rules without having the store cluttered with junk designed to increase the app count.The first change is the name, which now makes more sense. "Windows Marketplace for Mobile" just didn't roll off of the tongue and "Windows Marketplace for Phone" would have been downright absurd given it is only for one brand of phone. Windows Phone Marketplace is easy to remember and accurately describes it.

Developers have to pay $99 per year which allows them to submit an unlimited number of paid apps and up to five free apps. After five freebies are submitted, you have to pay $19.99 for additional submissions. This policy should help keep too many useless apps from getting into the store. Not too many people are going to fork over $99 to write Windows Phone versions of iFart or Freebird.

Freemium and ad-funded apps are also now supported in addition to free and paid apps. A new trial API is also available which mitigates the chances people will ask for a refund. The developer sets the time period of the trial.

The marketplace will retain the 70/30 revenue split and continue offering refunds for users that are dissatisfied with an app.

If you are a developer and want to read the full list of policies, head over to the Windows Blog which has a link to the full 28 page document outlining all of the certification requirements.

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