Nokia Gives U.S. Consumers Short End of the Stick. Again. - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile
Commentary
3/23/2007
02:03 PM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
Commentary
50%
50%

Nokia Gives U.S. Consumers Short End of the Stick. Again.

Yesterday Nokia finally released its fully featured flagship phone, the N95. It may not have a touch screen and slick Apple GUI, but the N95 is as close to an iPhone killer as you're going to get. Its drool-worthy spec list checks off every major functionality a so-called "multimedia computer" should have, including the Symbian Series 60 3rd Edition operating system, a 5-megapixel

Yesterday Nokia finally released its fully featured flagship phone, the N95. It may not have a touch screen and slick Apple GUI, but the N95 is as close to an iPhone killer as you're going to get. Its drool-worthy spec list checks off every major functionality a so-called "multimedia computer" should have, including the Symbian Series 60 3rd Edition operating system, a 5-megapixel camera, and integrated GPS. The phone, however, is only available in certain Asian, European, and Middle Eastern markets.Why, oh why, Nokia, do you forsake your American fans?

The fact that it's not available in the United States is one issue, but there are several others at play. One cool aspect of the N95 is that is has the latest 3G capabilities, based on high-speed downlink packet access technology. Considering the multimedia uses of the phone, 3G is an essential component in making the overall experience of the device as good as possible. When high-speed downlink packet access isn't available, the N95 will fall back to EDGE 2.5G speeds in the GSM 850 band, which is technically compatible with certain U.S. wireless networks. It does not, however, have U.S. compatible 3G radio technology.

Furthermore, the European version of the N95 comes equipped with Wi-Fi, as do many other Nokia phones. While it's not Nokia's fault, any potential U.S. variant of the N95 is likely to be stripped of this feature as well.

What this boils down to is that if and when this device ever comes to the United States, it will leave U.S. consumers with a 2.5G radio in a phone that demands so much more.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

News
Remote Work Tops SF, NYC for Most High-Paying Job Openings
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  7/20/2021
Slideshows
Blockchain Gets Real Across Industries
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  7/22/2021
Commentary
Seeking a Competitive Edge vs. Chasing Savings in the Cloud
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/19/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
2021 State of ITOps and SecOps Report
2021 State of ITOps and SecOps Report
This new report from InformationWeek explores what we've learned over the past year, critical trends around ITOps and SecOps, and where leaders are focusing their time and efforts to support a growing digital economy. Download it today!
Video
Current Issue
Monitoring Critical Cloud Workloads Report
In this report, our experts will discuss how to advance your ability to monitor critical workloads as they move about the various cloud platforms in your company.
Slideshows
Flash Poll