Stalker App Crosses Privacy Lines - InformationWeek

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Commentary
3/2/2010
12:05 AM
Ed Hansberry
Ed Hansberry
Commentary
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Stalker App Crosses Privacy Lines

There is a new app that allows you to take a picture of someone and get personal information on them from various social networks. It does this using facial recognition and then matches it against photos on sites like Twitter and Facebook. You can begin to see the possibilities.

There is a new app that allows you to take a picture of someone and get personal information on them from various social networks. It does this using facial recognition and then matches it against photos on sites like Twitter and Facebook. You can begin to see the possibilities.Once you know their account on Twitter, Facebook, My Space or other social networks, you can glean quite a bit of information from them. You may be able to get their address or phone number from their personal pages. Even if you just get their name, you can use Google to look for information that may be available on the web.

So, you are at a party and someone snaps a picture of you with their camera. Within minutes the user has your name which is enough to get started. He didn't take your picture because of your pretty face, but because he noticed the expensive watch you are wearing, the big gem on your finger or the car you drove up in. Your address should be pretty easy to get, as well as the company you work for. Now he just has to monitor your Twitter feed to see when you next post that you are out doing something. Your home is empty and he can now comfortably make his move.

That is just one possible scenario. The Sun has a number of other uses that are much higher on the creepy scale. This app is a perfect example of just because you can do a thing doesn't mean you should do a thing.

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