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Startup Promises Smoother Windows Mobile Rollouts

A new company, Enterprise Mobile, is about to debut as a managed service provider that helps companies deploy e-mail and enterprise applications on Windows Mobile devices. The newcomer is touting its ties with Microsoft as an advantage.
A new company, Enterprise Mobile, is about to debut as a managed service provider that helps companies deploy e-mail and enterprise applications on Windows Mobile devices. The newcomer is touting its ties with Microsoft as an advantage.Enterprise Mobile's chairman and CEO is Mort Rosenthal, founder of cell-phone retailer IMO and, before that, Corporate Software. VP of architecture Tomas Vetrovsky formerly worked at Microsoft as a marketing manager responsible for business accounts on Windows Mobile deployments.

The company's Web site describes it as a soup-to-nuts Windows Mobile service provider that offers planning, architecture, and deployment services, and training and support. The vendor will provision Windows Mobile devices in advance of distributing them to employees and keep them updated over the air. It also will help with BlackBerry to Windows Mobile migration.

Enterprise Mobile describes a partnership with Microsoft, vaguely, as "jointly working with customers, sharing technology, and developing service offerings targeted at enterprise requirements."

In anticipation of its coming-out party on Oct. 23, Enterprise Mobile this week was offering interviews under embargo, which I declined. In a chat with Yankee Group analyst Emily Green last month, Rosenthal said businesses need help breaking through restrictions placed on them by cellular carriers. "It's a service gap," Rosenthal said. "Carriers are oriented around raw bandwidth and minutes, and enterprises need a simple managed service."

InformationWeek has written a lot about the barriers to widespread corporate adoption of mobile e-mail. If Enterprise Mobile can lower those barriers, it should do well.