T-Mobile To Put Android On Non-Mobile Phone Devices - InformationWeek

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4/7/2009
06:50 AM
Ed Hansberry
Ed Hansberry
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T-Mobile To Put Android On Non-Mobile Phone Devices

T-Mobile, the first carrier in the world to build a phone with Google's Android platform, is breaking new ground again. This time they are putting Android on a home phone and a tablet computer according to an article in the New York Times.

T-Mobile, the first carrier in the world to build a phone with Google's Android platform, is breaking new ground again. This time they are putting Android on a home phone and a tablet computer according to an article in the New York Times.Last week I said putting Android on netbooks makes little sense, but using Android as an embedded OS for home appliances is interesting. It now puts Android in a different field, competing with Wind River and Windows CE in smart appliances.

There are few details on the devices, but according to the article, the phone will be able to sync data with other devices. I am not sure what that data is exactly though. The current G1 from T-Mobile only syncs with servers on the internet. Perhaps it will sync music. The phone will also "handle basic computing jobs like checking the weather or managing data across a variety of devices in the home."

I don't know if these devices will be running a generic flavor of Android or if T-Mobile is customizing them so they are suited specifically for these purposes. There is no mention as to whether or not users will be able to visit the Android app store and install any app they want. T-Mobile will be marketing these to the average home user though, much like its T-Mobile @ Home service and related hardware, so they may restrict what can be installed on them to ensure the devices are as reliable as a toaster. The last thing T-Mobile wants is for their help lines to be swamped with calls about home phone problems because little Johnny has loaded the phone with so much free software the device fails to function properly.

With Android on the devices, you can be sure it is only a matter of time before someone hacks them up to customized them to do whatever they want though.

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