informa
/
1 MIN READ
Commentary

Verizon Wireless Kills Off The Palm Treo 755p

Well, that was a short-lived affair. Verizon Wireless has announced it is phasing out the Palm Treo 755p. Verizon only began selling the 755p several months ago, and apparently now favors the younger, hipper Centro to serve as its sole offering running the Palm platform. I can just barely make out "Taps" in the distance.
Well, that was a short-lived affair. Verizon Wireless has announced it is phasing out the Palm Treo 755p. Verizon only began selling the 755p several months ago, and apparently now favors the younger, hipper Centro to serve as its sole offering running the Palm platform. I can just barely make out "Taps" in the distance.Sprint began selling the Palm Treo 755p a full six months before Verizon picked it up. The 755p is the last full-sized Treo that runs the Palm operating system. Verizon's other Treo, the 700wx, runs the Windows Mobile platform. After being available briefly for $99 (same price as the Centro), the 755p is out of stock on the Verizon Wireless web site, and, according to Palm InfoCenter, it is being removed from display at Verizon retail outlets.

I can't say I am sad to see the Treo 755p go. It brought no real new innovations to the Palm platform when it was first made available. The Centro eclipses it is most respects. It is smaller, lighter, and more consumer friendly.

The Centro, itself, will likely be the last Palm device running the now ancient and decrepit Palm OS, which hasn't been truly updated in years. The entire mobile community is awaiting the arrival of Palm's brand new operating system, which is said to arrive sometime in early 2009. Until then, Palm will keep its head above water by treading with the Centro in hand.

Editor's Choice
Brian T. Horowitz, Contributing Reporter
Samuel Greengard, Contributing Reporter
Nathan Eddy, Freelance Writer
Brandon Taylor, Digital Editorial Program Manager
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek
Sara Peters, Editor-in-Chief, InformationWeek / Network Computing