Windows Phone 7 Browser Bests Blackberry Torch - InformationWeek

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8/6/2010
12:01 AM
Ed Hansberry
Ed Hansberry
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Windows Phone 7 Browser Bests Blackberry Torch

There are several new tidbits on information available on Windows Phone 7, including a head-to-head comparison of how its browser stacks up to the Blackberry Torch. Suffice it to say, the Torch didn't hold a candle to Microsoft's newest offering.

There are several new tidbits on information available on Windows Phone 7, including a head-to-head comparison of how its browser stacks up to the Blackberry Torch. Suffice it to say, the Torch didn't hold a candle to Microsoft's newest offering.The Torch has been hailed as the "best Blackberry ever" by RIM executives. Engadget decided to see how it fared against Windows Phone 7 using a prototype device. According to PocketNow, who watched the live stream, WP7's browser was able to zoom, pan and render quite well while the Torch's browser was "almost unusable." Keep in mind too that WP7 was an unfinished OS on a prototype device whereas the Torch was the same one you'll be able to get next week at AT&T.

Speaking of browsers, there is also some bad news for WP7. HTML5 and Flash will not be supported on the initial release. In fact, for HTML 5, there are "no concrete plans" to add HTML5 support to the browser, so there is no telling when it will arrive. Flash though should be available when Adobe finishes the client, which could be six months after WP7 ships. I'll believe that when I see it. I've been hearing of Flash support on smartphones for several years, and it always seems to be six months out.

Finally, Paul Thurrott discovered that his WP7 device wouldn't connect to a WiFi access point unless the SSID was being broadcast. Hiding the SSID is a security measure to hide your wireless network, but that is relatively easy to circumvent. It is still good practice to hide it though to keep casual snoopers from trying to gain access. What I don't know is, can you unhide the SSID, connect the device, then rehide it and still be able to connect to it later? I've had to do that trick with an HP laptop several years ago.

Even if that trick works, it shouldn't be necessary. Keep in mind though that WP7 is still unfinished and hopefully this is one issue that will be corrected before the device ships.



Click to see "Slideshow: Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 Revealed."

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