Windows Phone 7 Sales And The Kill Switch - InformationWeek

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Commentary
11/4/2010
12:38 AM
Ed Hansberry
Ed Hansberry
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Windows Phone 7 Sales And The Kill Switch

Sales of the device appear to be brisk in Europe where it launched just over two weeks ago. That is good news for Microsoft. Will the trend continue on November 8 when it launches in the US? We've also discovered that there is a kill switch Microsoft can flip if it deems it necessary to remove a rogue program.

Sales of the device appear to be brisk in Europe where it launched just over two weeks ago. That is good news for Microsoft. Will the trend continue on November 8 when it launches in the US? We've also discovered that there is a kill switch Microsoft can flip if it deems it necessary to remove a rogue program.The SFGate is saying that sales in Europe and Australia are "better than expected" which should please those in the mobile device division at Microsoft.

Phones are running short at some of the carriers, or they are out altogether. Germany's O2 no longer has the HD7 in stock and Australia's Telstra has run out of the Mozart. Other carriers are running low. While the low or no stock levels are a result of sales, a parts shortage could exacerbate the issue as carriers try to replenish inventory levels. Microsoft is projected to sell 3.5 million to 4 million devices in the fourth quarter.

Microsoft is also keen on protecting the platform once the consumer has it. They have a review process to weed out poorly written apps that can cause problems with the phone while in use, but in the event something gets by the review process, Microsoft can take care of that too. PCPro has information on how Microsoft can remotely remove an app that can " pose a security or privacy risk, such as a Trojan planted in an app."

It is a little disconcerting to know Microsoft has that ability, but it is nothing that Apple and Google don't have either. The question is, how much self control will Microsoft exercises with this power. I'm ok if they remove a security risk - I wouldn't want that on my phone anyway. But what if I download an app that gives me a certain feature that a carrier doesn't like. Will the carrier be able to pressure Microsoft into removing it from devices that have already installed it?

Only time will tell.

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