Windows Struggles As iOS, Android Dominate Smartphone Space, IDC Says - InformationWeek

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Commentary
12/4/2015
12:15 PM
Eric Zeman
Eric Zeman
Commentary

Windows Struggles As iOS, Android Dominate Smartphone Space, IDC Says

Microsoft will have a hard time selling Windows handsets while Apple and Google keep their shares at or near current levels, according to research firm IDC.

(Image: JasminSeidel/iStockphoto)

(Image: JasminSeidel/iStockphoto)

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Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2015 | 1:50:51 PM
AllJoyn
Microsoft is including Alljoyn with Windows 10. Alljoyn is an internet of things platform that can be used to create a smart home. It has a lot of support from appliance makers, and makes it possible to control a home from any Windows10 mobile device. It could very well make a difference for Microsoft.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2015 | 11:54:54 PM
Re: AllJoyn
I also depends on how the competitor will react and how fast the market can accept this new innovation. I remember long time ago Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) is a hot topic in telecom industry. But soon it's replaced by more powerful realtime communication apps on Smartphones.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
12/6/2015 | 12:14:13 PM
Re: AllJoyn
Personally, i think it was BYOD that killed off BlackBerry, and caused this market saturation with Android and iOS.  When employees were given the choice of a business device, they merged the two and got either iOS or Android.  For Microsoft, the real sweet spot for them is business users, since they can natively provide more integration with Microsoft business tools like CRM and Office, and hardware like Surface. The problem is that BYOD is going to make it very hard to win employees over when it comes to having them adopt a Windows Phone, and getting companies to cover the costs of a new device will also be a tough sell.  The high costs of a device alone means folks are hanging onto their current device longer, and only replacing when it ceases to work or becomes too outdated.

There's also the question about applications.  The majority of application creation is skewed towards Android and iOS merely based on market demographics.  Getting them to code for a third platform will be not only costly, but less than desireable unless there are conversion tools available.

For me, the very cool redeeming factor of the Windows Phone is that you could do some great things with the XBox in terms of integration or second screen experiences.  This could sway the XBox market potentially, but only if they deem the rest of the applications and phone specifications to be compelling enough...which sadly since the design is limited to one manufacturer, it will be tricky.

Microsoft has a strong legacy, it's just a matter of if the market pulls back into a multi-platform market, or simply continues with two main platforms.
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
12/7/2015 | 12:23:54 PM
Chinese market
IDC says it believes China is already maturing into a replacement -- and not a first-adopter -- market.

Interesting. So buyers "mature" into replacement markets? Or is mature the wrong word? I would think the replacement market would be due to the difficult economy, no?
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
12/21/2015 | 9:59:59 AM
Re: Chinese market
Soozyg,  Once you get your first phone, what ever you get after it is a replacement phone. When you get a replacement may hae to do with the economy, but the fact you already havea phone (and therefore havea bias for that brand if you liked it and against it if you didn't) makes it a replacement market. So I think all it was saying was that most people in China that are going to get smart phones already have them so now they will only get them when they want a new one, and since most people are loyal to the brand they first got unless it's been problematic, they will probably get the same kind of phone.
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