NASA, South Korea Team On Satellite Research - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Business & Finance
News
1/29/2008
12:00 PM
50%
50%

NASA, South Korea Team On Satellite Research

The goal is to collaborate on communication, navigation systems, planetary exploration, lunar science, rovers, small satellites, and related technologies.

NASA's Ames Research Center has agreed to work with South Korea's Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) to explore possibilities for collaboration on small satellite research and development.

NASA signed a memorandum with KAIST Saturday. NASA said both countries will hold technical discussions on satellite communication, navigation systems, planetary exploration, lunar science, rovers, small satellites, and related technologies.

South Korea created KAIST in 1971. Twenty-one years later, professor Soon-dal Choi led a KAIST research team to launch Korea's first small satellite Uribyeol 1. Since then, the country has launched 10 small satellites, the most advanced being Arirang 2. NASA said the satellite, which began operating in July 2006, can distinguish objects as small as 39.37 inches (one meter) wide on Earth.

About 8,000 students and 442 professors work at eight research institutes in the Daedeok Research Complex, which is 90 miles south of Seoul. The institutes specialize in bioengineering, information technology, ecoenergy, and other fields. KAIST said other areas of interest can be added during future discussions.

NASA Ames Director S. Pete Worden said American researchers at Ames welcome the opportunity to work with South Korea on satellite development to advance space exploration.

KAIST President Nam Pyo Suh called the agreement a historic event for KAIST and NASA.

"KAIST-educated technicians will have opportunities to contribute to NASA programs, while learning new approaches to research and development by working on large NASA projects," Suh said in a prepared statement. "Through this effort, the U.S.-Korea relationship in science, technology, and education will be further strengthened immeasurably."

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll