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CES: AddLogix Moves A PC's Display To Any TV Over Wi-Fi

One of the major themes here at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is wireless TV. Generally speaking, this usually involves the wireless transmission of content from a high-definition source like a DVD player or a cable box to a flat panel (there's a ton of such wireless transmission being shown at CES). But, if there's a neglected stepchild in all of the wireless TV buzz, it's how to do the same thing with a PC (for example, in a conference room). AddLogix thinks it has the solution. (
One of the major themes here at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is wireless TV. Generally speaking, this usually involves the wireless transmission of content from a high-definition source like a DVD player or a cable box to a flat panel (there's a ton of such wireless transmission being shown at CES). But, if there's a neglected stepchild in all of the wireless TV buzz, it's how to do the same thing with a PC (for example, in a conference room). AddLogix thinks it has the solution. (This post includes a video.)Tell me if this sounds familiar: You walk into a conference room and you have to connect your PC to a TV or a flat panel to make a presentation. If it's a flat panel, hopefully it's one that supports VGA input and you can hardwire your notebook to the display via a VGA cable. If it's a TV that doesn't have VGA inputs (hopefully, whoever equipped your conference room didn't make that dumb mistake), you have to figure out a way to convert VGA outputs to the component inputs on the display. It can be a messy, unpredictable situation.

AddLogix is here at CES with a pair of solutions -- one for consumers (the InternetVue 2020, the other for businesses (the 2100) -- that turns any flat panel (or TV) into a wireless display for PCs.

The InternetVue 2020 (the one aimed at consumers) is a receiver that's placed close to the TV, flat panel, or projector and it has component outputs on its back side that you'd connect directly to the component input on the display device. The reason this is targeted at consumers is because component input is typically the lowest common denominator of interface found in the home environment when it comes to piping content onto TV or even some lower-cost flat panels. Another way the 2020 is optimized for consumers is that it's designed to handle the higher frame rates for the sort of content that consumers typically would consume: video.

On the other hand, the 2100 has VGA and DVI outputs (since the displays found in businesses are more likely to have the matching inputs) and is not as robust as the consumer device when it comes to supported frame rates since motion video is atypical of the type content viewed in business settings (think PowerPoints). On the client side (a PC), all that's needed is a Wi-Fi connection and AddLogix software. The street price for both products is around $200. Check 'em out in the following video.

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