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Comcast Broadcasts Porn Clip During Super Bowl

Super Bowl watchers in Tucson, Ariz., "got more action than they bargained for" when cable provider Comcast showed a short and extremely graphic porn clip during the final moments of the game.
Super Bowl watchers in Tucson, Ariz., "got more action than they bargained for" when cable provider Comcast showed a short and extremely graphic porn clip during the final moments of the game.According to the Arizona Daily Star (registration required):


Officials at Comcast said about 30 seconds from Club Jenna, an adult cable television channel, were shown on the local Super Bowl telecast. The company was still working Sunday night to figure out how it happened.

Predictably, the companies involved are pointing their, um, fingers at each other. KVOA, the local TV station where the Super Bowl aired, says it had "nothing to do with it," and that the error is a "Comcast issue." Comcast says it gets its KVOA signal from Cox Communications. And Cox points the blame back to Comcast.

Feeling brave? Want to see for yourself? The actual clip is here. Warning: It's extremely graphic.

What is with the Super Bowl, anyway? Why can't they just show the game? In 2004, Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake had their famous "wardrobe malfunction." Watch that video here. (Warning: There's actually nothing to see.)

And way back in 1968, NBC earned the hatred of football fans by cutting off the last 65 seconds of an American Football League game between the New York Jets and Oakland Raiders, to air a pre-scheduled TV movie of the children's story Heidi. When the network cut away, the Jets were leading 32-29, but the Raiders came back and scored 14 points in the final minute and five seconds, winning 43-32 -- while fans were stuck watching a little girl, an old Swiss guy, and a goat-herd gamboling and yodeling through the Alps.

Oh, well. At least they didn't mess with the hour-long special showing of The Office that immediately followed the Super Bowl. What does that Dwight have to do to get fired, anyway?

(Via Chris Pirillo.)

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