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HP Unveils Thin Client, Blade Workstation

The thin client is based on an AMD dual-core processor and an ATI Radeon integrated graphics card, while the workstation can be configured with one or two Intel Xeon processors and Nvidia graphics.
Hewlett-Packard on Thursday introduced a thin client and blade workstation that offers more processing and graphics performance than HP's previous products.

The HP gt7725 thin client and HP ProLiant xw2x220c blade workstation are aimed at companies running 3D mechanical computer-aided applications and other graphics-intensive software. The products are the latest in HP's portfolio of hardware for running desktops in which application processing is performed on a central server.

The gt7725 computer supports up to four monitors, making it an option for financial service organizations that need to display market data across multiple displays. In addition, the computer has significant power to display 2D and 3D computer-aided design applications, engineering simulation and images displayed through oil and gas exploration software.

The thin client is based on an Advanced Micro Devices Turion dual-core 2.3 GHz processor and AMD's ATI Radeon HD 3200 integrated graphics. The computer supports resolutions of 2,560 x 1,600 pixels per display with two monitors, or 1,920 x 1,200 pixels per display with four monitors. The gt7725 is scheduled to be available in January with HP's Linux-based ThinPro operating system. Support for Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard 2009 is scheduled for later that year. Prices start at $749.

The ProLiant xw2x220c workstation can be configured with one or two Intel Xeon processors and a dedicated Nvidia FX 770M graphics card that computes and renders the interactive desktop image. The workstation is scheduled to be available Nov. 17 with prices starting at $2,850.

Should you slim down with the newest generation of blade server? InformationWeek has done an analysis of other next-generation systems. Download the report here (registration required).

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