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IT Suppliers Unaware Of Green Opportunities

When I read the Carbon Disclosure Project's (CDP) just-released Supply Chain Report 2009, I can't help thinking about Vinny Gambini's (Joe Pesci) question to the lard-scooping short-order cook in My Cousin Vinny: "Excuse me, you guys down here hear about the ongoing cholesterol problem in the country?"
When I read the Carbon Disclosure Project's (CDP) just-released Supply Chain Report 2009, I can't help thinking about Vinny Gambini's (Joe Pesci) question to the lard-scooping short-order cook in My Cousin Vinny: "Excuse me, you guys down here hear about the ongoing cholesterol problem in the country?"Many businesses in the IT supply chain apparently haven't heard about the ongoing green computing opportunities in the country. I'm not sure why. I seem to recall seeing something about it in the paper, right next to the story about catastrophic climate change. And a few columns over from the story about the ongoing cholesterol problem in the country.

Yet, the first-ever global collaboration on climate change between major businesses and their suppliers found that while information technology companies were generally aware of the risks posed by climate change, few understood they are in a unique position to battle climate change.

"Interestingly, despite their apparent risk awareness, when identifying opportunities only 47% perceived opportunities arising from the physical effects of climate change," states the report. "Given the already established role of information technology in monitoring, reporting, and interpreting climate change impacts at company, national, and international levels, as well as many other well-publicized roles for information technology in the emerging green economy, this seems surprising."

To their credit, IT suppliers at least were aware that climate change poses various threats to their business, including regulatory sanctions and weather-related disasters. On the other hand, one-third of all 634 suppliers who responded to the survey said climate change posed no risks at all.

In a prepared statement, J.T. Wang, chairman of Acer, said his company "has used CDP Supply Chain to identify suppliers' understanding of energy and climate change, to verify the potential climate risks in the coming carbon-constrained age and see opportunities for innovative carbon management within the supply chain. It was notable that there was a high level of engagement and interest from our Asian-based suppliers who were willing to work with Acer towards becoming climate-friendly suppliers."

Given Acer's poor environmental track record, it will be good if its suppliers are at least aware of the environmental impact their work has.

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