Samsung Unveils Mobile TV Chipset - InformationWeek

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Samsung Unveils Mobile TV Chipset

Multistandard support means handset users will be able to choose which broadcasting services they want to use without changing their mobile application.

Samsung Electronics on Wednesday unveiled a multiband mobile TV chipset for use in cellular phones in Europe, Asia, and the United States.

The chipset, built with a 65-nanometer manufacturing process, includes a multistandard channel decoder and a multiband radio frequency tuner. The hardware supports multiple digital standards, including DVB-H/T, DAB-IP, ISDB-T, and terrestrial DMB.

Multistandard support means handset users will be able to choose which broadcasting services they want to use without changing their mobile application. "Although a new market, we see high growth potential in mobile TV applications," Yiwan Wong, a VP in Samsung's semiconductor business, said in a statement. Samsung is releasing the new chipset in Europe and Asia first.

The chipset's channel decoder transforms the analog signal into a digital signal for image and audio playback. The tuner, which receives the analog broadcast signal, is a general-purpose device that supports UHF, VHF, and L-band commonly used in Europe and the United States.

The chipset is offered either as two standalone integrated circuits or as a system-in-chip package, which includes the tuner and decoder on a single module. Samsung's support to handset makers includes software, reference platforms, test solutions, and extended component lineup such as the application processor.

Consumer acceptance of video on a mobile phone is bigger than first predicted by many experts. Between 60% and 85% of people who experienced video on a handset enjoyed it, according to Research and Markets. The biggest reason is boredom.

In 80% of the trials surveyed by the research firm in Finland, England, France, Italy, Korea, and Japan, boredom ranked as the biggest driver for watching chunks of video throughout the day.

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