9 Reasons Flash Must Die, And Soon - InformationWeek

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Software // Enterprise Applications
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7/19/2015
12:06 PM

9 Reasons Flash Must Die, And Soon

Whether you're a user or a developer, the reasons to leave Flash in the past keep multiplying.
2 of 10

Flash Is Hungry

Let's run this down: The world is going mobile. There's no doubt that more and more of our computing lives happen on handheld devices. Those handheld devices are getting smaller. It won't be long before you can use the edge of a smart phone to take care of unwanted body hair. And with the thinner devices comes a smaller set of batteries.
Because Flash is an interpreted language, it's heavy -- so heavy that, in conjunction with the way Flash renders video, it's an absolute battery killer.
And it's not just a battery killer on mobile devices. Want to see how quickly the battery on your laptop can run to zero? Load your browser with a bunch of Flash-heavy pages in tabs and let them all run. You can hear the giant electronic sucking sound as the battery winds toward zero.

(Image: TaniaVdb via Pixabay)

Flash Is Hungry

Let's run this down: The world is going mobile. There's no doubt that more and more of our computing lives happen on handheld devices. Those handheld devices are getting smaller. It won't be long before you can use the edge of a smart phone to take care of unwanted body hair. And with the thinner devices comes a smaller set of batteries.

Because Flash is an interpreted language, it's heavy -- so heavy that, in conjunction with the way Flash renders video, it's an absolute battery killer.

And it's not just a battery killer on mobile devices. Want to see how quickly the battery on your laptop can run to zero? Load your browser with a bunch of Flash-heavy pages in tabs and let them all run. You can hear the giant electronic sucking sound as the battery winds toward zero.

(Image: TaniaVdb via Pixabay)

2 of 10
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nomii
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50%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2015 | 9:02:48 PM
Keep evolving or be thing of past
I am very sad at the situation with flash as I was a die hard fan of flash. But it is very true that if you became stagnant and can not evolve  further you must leave space for others. I cannot find a suitable alternative of flash as I have never tried anything else :). Suggestions are most welcome to find the true alterative of this. I say what firefox has done was in the making,
Gary_EL
50%
50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/20/2015 | 12:01:16 AM
Still stuck with it
Because a lot of really great websites - including this one - still run content based on flash
CY148
100%
0%
CY148,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2015 | 8:26:08 AM
I block it ...
As a user, I modified Chrome and Firefox to block flash ...if I want to run it, I can always "...right-click to run plug-in."

I admit Flash has its uses (I know well the challenge of finding a developer tool to solve problems), but as an end-user it is an annoying distraction (do people really click on those annoying animated ads? I'll put up with the annoyance of disabling Flash to avoid them).

Who knows, maybe a new tool will come of this? And I'll probably be blocking that one in a few years as well.
Wolf29
0%
100%
Wolf29,
User Rank: Strategist
7/20/2015 | 9:20:05 AM
Flash was a big part of my development life 15 years ago
I used to use Dreamweaver and Fireworks from Macromedia, and Flash sites were very cool, even with my limited graphics skill.  The problems with flash for a web site are

1. A flash image has no useful text for the search-engine crawlers to read, so your site is ranked lower than an html site created in notepad.

2. Flash sites are harder to update than regular sites, and much harder than WordPress sites.

3. Flash is large and takes a lot of time to load.

RIP Flash.
RandyT255
50%
50%
RandyT255,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2015 | 9:26:20 AM
vitriol off target
The issue is not Flash or Air.  It's the antique plug-in architecture that provides security vulnerabilities.  

There seems to be a Flash/Anti-Flash tribalism that defies logic and reason.   

 
jastroff
100%
0%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/20/2015 | 10:00:54 AM
Re: Flash was a big part of my development life 15 years ago
nice summary.

The designers I hired to do graphics work 15 years ago would use  Dreamweaver and Fireworks from Macromedia, and Flash sites  -- which were very nice at the time, and did the job for corporate multimedia work product at a time when it was all still kind of new.  
Jschmidt27
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50%
Jschmidt27,
User Rank: Strategist
7/20/2015 | 11:46:54 AM
Re: I block it ...
FOr the last year, FLASH has been bringing Chrome to its knees with chrome not releasing memory. There has been quite a blog building on it on the google forum. I disabled it and if needed I right click as you do. But people are getting pretty steamed with google not paying attention because after all it is a free product.
frazo920
50%
50%
frazo920,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2015 | 12:24:03 PM
What about the wonderful, powerful Flash development tools
What about the wonderful, logical WYSIWYG interface of Flash that has allowed us normal people to develop reasonably powerful, common sense  applications thay is not being replicated by anyone else?  Having coded applications in Java, C. C++, Python, Fortran, Cobol, Assembly and other long-gone scripting languages, I am amazed by how we call for the elimination of this blessed tool, without even thinking of normal, not-necessarily "coding" people who have needs to apply multimedia technologies more reasonably.  IS it better to think of suggest the creation of more REASONABLY FRIENDLY and still secure development alternatives?
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
7/20/2015 | 2:33:33 PM
Re: Keep evolving or be thing of past
@nomii, have you taken a serious look at the animation features of HTML5? Depending on precisely what you want to do, you might have to add some Java code, but I think that much of what folks are doing in Flash has an alternative in HTML5.
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
7/20/2015 | 2:35:05 PM
Re: Still stuck with it
@Gary-EL, I'm very aware of the irony of calling for the end of Flash on a web site that still uses Flash. I will say that this site should see the end of Flash within the next few months, but until then the irony will be thick!
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