Windows At 30: Microsoft's OS Keeps Evolving - InformationWeek

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3/2/2015
04:28 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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Windows At 30: Microsoft's OS Keeps Evolving

Microsoft Windows is finishing up its third decade of change. Here's a look at how the operating system has evolved along with new technologies and consumer preferences.
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(Image: Simon via Pixabay)

(Image: Simon via Pixabay)

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mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 3:06:44 PM
Re: This was funny...
It was funny. How about this:

"In order to run the upgrade, PCs had to have a processor of 386DX or higher and at least 4MB of RAM"
mmuldoon52501
100%
0%
mmuldoon52501,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2015 | 11:54:20 AM
Windows Fails
Microsoft kinda lost their way when Bill "retired".  ME was bad enough but Vista was crap.  Windows 7 saved us until the came out with 8.  One thing MS doesn't seem to understand is we don't want them copying Apple.  They have their fans but most people want Windows that they know how to use and all 8 did was confuse users because it wasn't what they knew how to use.  You can fix it with Start8, Classic Shell, and others but you shouldn't have to do that.  The only thing that MS could do that was worse they did: they took away the way we ALL used Office and put in the damn Ribbon. Hack! Cough! Puke!  Thank goodness Ofice 2003 still runs on my machine soI can actually do work instead of spending all my time playing "ok it used to be right here now where did they hide what I need to be production."
JohnHam1978
0%
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JohnHam1978,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2015 | 11:13:22 AM
People applauded windows xp!?
I am sorry. I don't know where you get your information but beside Windows 7, no one in the general public has ever applauded a Microsoft OS on release. Windows 95 had people furious most of that caused by compatibility issues with legacy software and hardware. Windows 98 was blamed every time there was a blue screen. Windows ME would self destruct almost like clockwork after a set number of days of uptime. Windows NT 3.51 and 4.0 were virtually unsupported in the world of drivers. Windows 2000 was a push to get people to ditch DOS programs and switch to full 32bit which again was wrought with confusion being alongside WinME and with compatibility problems still hanging around in legacy programs and hardware. Then we have Windows XP which the general public HATED because they were still in shock from the 9x/NT switch over and simply hated the new start menu! It wasn't until hardware and software vendors caught up and people got used to the colorful XP GUI a year or two later that people "loved" windows Xp. It wasn't until they realized they were going through the culture shock again and were addicted to the 8 year status quo that people expressed their "love" for XP. This was really just a love for the familiar. Anytime change happens, the general public hates it while they become accustomed to it.
jastroff
50%
50%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 10:52:19 AM
Windows at 30
Thanks for the summary. I remember supporting many of these early versions for new computer users at Columbia University. DOS was a challenge. And it still forms the basis of a PC OS.

The software industry that sprung up around MSFT, even in the early days, was quite healthy. Word processing programs that are long gone but were better or different from WORD, etc. SPSS on the PC had about 10 disks to load it up.

I wonder how far MSFT would have gotten in their graphical interface if the Apple MAC had not appeared when it did.
midmachine
50%
50%
midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
3/3/2015 | 10:52:11 AM
This was funny...
"It also altered the course of human productivity with the introduction of virtual solitaire."
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