Windows At 30: Microsoft's OS Keeps Evolving - InformationWeek

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3/2/2015
04:28 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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Windows At 30: Microsoft's OS Keeps Evolving

Microsoft Windows is finishing up its third decade of change. Here's a look at how the operating system has evolved along with new technologies and consumer preferences.
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Windows 1: For The 'Serious PC User'

Microsoft shipped Windows 1.0 on November 10, 1985, two years after the product was first announced. Interface Manager was considered by the company to be its final name, but Windows won because developers thought it was more fitting for the boxes, or 'windows,' inherent to the system's design. 

Windows 1 allowed users to click their way through screens, drop-down menus, icons, scroll bars, and dialog boxes designed to simplify program use. This early version, which required a minimum of 256 KB to operate, also featured several familiar programs, such as Paint, Notepad, MS-DOS file management, calendar, calculator, Windows Writer, and clock.

It even had a game, called Reversi, which relied on mouse control in an effort to get users accustomed to clicking with the mouse, an input device critical to using the system but not common at the time.

Bill Gates, who led development, called Windows 1 'unique software designed for the serious PC user.'

(Image: Microsoft)

Windows 1: For The "Serious PC User"

Microsoft shipped Windows 1.0 on November 10, 1985, two years after the product was first announced. Interface Manager was considered by the company to be its final name, but Windows won because developers thought it was more fitting for the boxes, or "windows," inherent to the system's design.

Windows 1 allowed users to click their way through screens, drop-down menus, icons, scroll bars, and dialog boxes designed to simplify program use. This early version, which required a minimum of 256 KB to operate, also featured several familiar programs, such as Paint, Notepad, MS-DOS file management, calendar, calculator, Windows Writer, and clock.

It even had a game, called Reversi, which relied on mouse control in an effort to get users accustomed to clicking with the mouse, an input device critical to using the system but not common at the time.

Bill Gates, who led development, called Windows 1 "unique software designed for the serious PC user."

(Image: Microsoft)

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