If IBM Buys Sun... - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software // Information Management
Commentary
3/20/2009
09:43 AM
Tony Byrne
Tony Byrne
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

If IBM Buys Sun...

I'll leave it to other analysts to discuss potential overlap in the areas of hardware, operating systems, and databases. Instead I'll focus on the platforms of greatest interest to content technology people. First, there's the future of Sun's meandering enterprise portal strategy...

The reports that IBM will buy Sun Microsystems are still just rumors with no confirmation. Might not happen. Still interesting to think about. I'll leave it to other analysts to discuss potential overlap in the areas of hardware, operating systems, and databases. Instead I'll focus on the platforms of greatest interest to content technology people.First, there's the future of Sun's meandering enterprise portal strategy. Early this decade, Sun joined other application server vendors by layering a portal product on top. Sun Portal Server was reasonably popular in academia, but otherwise never really took off, despite more recent efforts to spiff it up and put it into open source. Then Sun announced an intention to come out with its own version of open source portal platform Liferay (which CMS Watch reviews in its portals research). IBM has been amenable to open source, but any commercialized Liferay platform would have to compete with the behemoth IBM WebSphere Portal Server. That's a tough one.

Sun has also been rumored, over the years, to have come close to acquiring a Web CMS or Collaboration vendor. Never happened. Sun has been working on various Social Software modules designed to boost its MySQL franchise, but they haven't been productized. Seems to me that IBM has a better history of bringing skunkworks projects to market, so if the deal goes down, maybe we'll see more Sun's R&D in this area.

Finally, there's the question of Java specs and standards. Sun has been steadily easing its hold over Java; hard to tell what an IBM acquisition would mean here.

I think the most important thing about any acquisition is this: Big Blue is no Borg. At least not on the software side. IBM is a highly diffuse and actually somewhat disorganized vendor that tends to acquire products, then routinely lose track of them. For current Sun licensees, maybe that's not a bad thing.I'll leave it to other analysts to discuss potential overlap in the areas of hardware, operating systems, and databases. Instead I'll focus on the platforms of greatest interest to content technology people. First, there's the future of Sun's meandering enterprise portal strategy...

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Commentary
Study Proposes 5 Primary Traits of Innovation Leaders
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/8/2019
Slideshows
Top-Paying U.S. Cities for Data Scientists and Data Analysts
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/5/2019
Slideshows
10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2020
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/1/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Getting Started With Emerging Technologies
Looking to help your enterprise IT team ease the stress of putting new/emerging technologies such as AI, machine learning and IoT to work for their organizations? There are a few ways to get off on the right foot. In this report we share some expert advice on how to approach some of these seemingly daunting tech challenges.
Slideshows
Flash Poll