Oracle Tackles Files in the Database, Again - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software // Information Management
Commentary
7/13/2007
12:05 PM
50%
50%

Oracle Tackles Files in the Database, Again

This week, Oracle announced 11g, the latest upgrade to its flagship database... Of particular interest is enhanced support for "LOBs" (Large Objects), such as documents, drawings, images, and so forth... It has long been the case that databases were ineffective at handling documents -- sometimes becoming grindingly slow -- but the performance gap has been closing over the past few years.

This week, Oracle announced 11g, the latest upgrade to its flagship database. The announcement brooks great interest within the ECM community because, as we detail in the ECM Suites Report, so many ECM tools (including all the leading players) utilize the Oracle database. Of particular interest is enhanced support for "LOBs" (Large Objects), such as documents, drawings, images, and so forth. Oracle says 11g can now provide: • Comparable performance to regular file servers for access to large files • Greater compression capabilities • The ability to encrypt LOBs within the database environmentIt has long been the case that databases were ineffective at handling enterprise documents -- sometimes becoming grindingly slow -- but the performance gap has been closing over the past few years. Of course, we've heard this story before -- that Oracle's latest database was going to obviate the need for a file system -- and the lack of traction for Oracle's own ECM products (developed in-house before Oracle acquired Stellent) suggests that to date, the market wasn't buying the story.

Nevertheless, given their druthers, many large enterprises would not make expensive file servers and proprietary repositories (long the backbone of DM and ECM systems) their first choice for managing ECM-related files. Surely IBM and Microsoft will respond with their own capabilities in this highly competitive database market.This week, Oracle announced 11g, the latest upgrade to its flagship database... Of particular interest is enhanced support for "LOBs" (Large Objects), such as documents, drawings, images, and so forth... It has long been the case that databases were ineffective at handling documents -- sometimes becoming grindingly slow -- but the performance gap has been closing over the past few years.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

News
Remote Work Tops SF, NYC for Most High-Paying Job Openings
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  7/20/2021
Slideshows
Blockchain Gets Real Across Industries
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  7/22/2021
Commentary
Seeking a Competitive Edge vs. Chasing Savings in the Cloud
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/19/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Monitoring Critical Cloud Workloads Report
In this report, our experts will discuss how to advance your ability to monitor critical workloads as they move about the various cloud platforms in your company.
Slideshows
Flash Poll